The Home of Midwood Science Research

Meet with FAA engineers

Posted on Sunday, February 21, 2016 by for Everyone, Lectures.

In honor of Engineers’ Week, representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Terminal Design Center will be at Midwood on Tuesday, February 23, 2016. Discussion will center on careers in engineering and what it’s like to work for the federal government. The meeting will take place in room A117 during period 9. All students are welcome to attend.

Engineer's Week banner FAA seal

2016 Talking Science

Posted on Sunday, November 29, 2015 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

Contact me immediately if you wish to attend this lecture AND are available. It runs from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM on the second Saturday in January. Space is limited and I must register early on Tuesday, December 1. Last year, we were only allowed 2 students because I waited until the end of the day to register. It filled up that quickly. Because demand is so high for this event, students who register and don’t show up (thus locking out other students) will have their grade lowered.

banner for Talking Science 2016
Save the Date

The Rockefeller University
invites your school to participate in

Talking science

Spend a day on campus at The Rockefeller University with preeminent biochemist and physician,Thomas P. Sakmar, M.D., to learn the science of drug discovery, and how new technology is transforming medicine.

Drug Discovery 101:
Precision Medicine for the 21st Century

Saturday, January 9, 2016 

   

The Rockefeller University
Caspary Auditorium
1230 York Avenue at East 66th Street
New York, NY 10065

   

Talking Science is intended for high school students only (preferably juniors and seniors) with a strong interest in science. Student attendance is limited to ten per school. Registration is required and will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. This event is provided at no cost to the school or students.

Registration opens on Tuesday, December 1, 2015. Information packets will be mailed to your school in advance of the registration open date.

www.rockefeller.edu/talkingscience

I count 48

Posted on Tuesday, November 10, 2015 by for Lectures.

Midwood Science was well represented at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) for the 10th annual lectures on Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research. This year’s lectures were more about general biomedical research than specific research on cancer. Dr. Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis (or "Anna-Kat" as the President of MSKCC Craig B. Thompson called her) talked about her amazing imaging technique that allowed her to make 3D movies of cells in developing mouse embryos. Dr. Cole Haynes taught us how mitochondria (the cell’s powerhouses) are affected by many different diseases from cancers to bacterial infections. Closing the show was Dr. Joao Xavier, a systems biologist who talked about everything from the growth of biofilms, to the spread of cancers, to the microbiome living inside our guts. "It’s about finding common principles in biology," he said.

Midwood was the best represented school at the event with what looks like 48 students in attendance. I know that it may seem like I am always writing about how some event is our "best" or "biggest" ever, but this honestly is our biggest year ever at MSKCC. The lectures were great, the students were great, and the pizza was pretty good too.

Public Lectures for the Fall Semester

Posted on Sunday, November 8, 2015 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

Tue. Nov.
10
What: Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research
 
When: Tuesday, November 10, 2015, 5:30–7:30
 
Where: Rockefeller Labs
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
430 E 67th St (between First and York Avenues)
New Work NY 10065
 
Registration: Now!
   
Thu. Dec.
3
What: Brooklyn Frontiers in Science (Art & Chemistry)
 
When: Thursday, December 3, 2015, 5:30–7:00
 
Where: Pfizer Auditorium
NYU Tandon School of Engineering
5 Metrotech Center
Brooklyn NY 11201
 
Registration: Anytime before the end of November.
   
Sat. Jan.
9
What: Talking Science (Medicine)
 
When: Saturday, January 9, 2016,10:00–3:00
 
Where: Caspary Auditorium
The Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue at East 66th Street
New York NY 10065
 
Registration: Opens on Tuesday, December 1. Limited to 10 students.
   

2015 Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Public Lecture

Posted on Friday, November 6, 2015 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

The Brooklyn Subsection of the American Chemical Society and the NYU Tandon School of Engineering present a free lecture to the public. The Science of Art and Color: Four thousand years of experimentation and discovery through the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Dr. Marco Leona
The Science of Art and Color
Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Lecture
Thursday, December 3, 2015, 5:30–7:00 PM
Pfizer Auditorium
NYU Tandon School of Engineering
5 Metrotech Center
Brooklyn, NY 11201
 

Dr. Marco Leona is the David H. Koch Scientist in Charge in the Department of Scientific Research at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

If you are interested in attending, please register here. Midwood Science Research students will receive extra credit if they attend and submit the public lecture assignment to Mr. Elert the day after. An attendance photo will also be taken.

Juniors interested in chemistry should consider using this scientific paper by Dr. Leona for Assignment 4: Analysis of a Contemporary Paper.

2015 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Monday, October 26, 2015 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

On Tuesday, November 10, 2015, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its tenth annual Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture for high school and college students. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place from 5:30–7:30 PM on the first floor of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Rockefeller Research Laboratories building (430 East 67th Street, between York and First Avenues).

Registration is easy, but finding a seat with a good view isn’t. This event has gotten so popular that the folks at MSKCC needed to set up satellite viewing stations in adjacent conference rooms. Get there a bit early if possible. Light refreshments have traditionally been served before the lectures begin (pizza, chips, fruit, soda, coffee). Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. (Consult the Extra Credit webpage for more info.) Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Place your completed (typed) assignment in my mailbox in the Research Room at any time during the school day on Thursday, November 12.

   
Craig B. Thompson Moderator

Memorial Sloan Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.

   
Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis, PhD, Developmental Biologist In the Beginning: What Embryos Teach Us about How Cells Decide What They Want to Be

Developmental biologist Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis studies pluripotency, cell lineage commitment, tissue patterning, and morphogenesis in the early mammalian embryo.

   
Cole Haynes, PhD, Cell Biology Program Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Its Consequences: From Aging to Cancer

Cell biologist Cole Haynes focuses on the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial function during development, aging, and cancer cell growth.

   
Joao Xavier, PhD, Computational Biology Program Ecology of the Microbiome: What the Gut Microbiota Reveals about Human Illness

Computational biologist Joao Xavier studies computer models and quantitative experiments of biofilm and cancer growth.

   

Research students attend Yummy Science lecture

Posted on Tuesday, January 6, 2015 by for Lectures, Media.

"You’re not talking to your tomatoes," said Bill Yoses, former White House Pastry Chef to a crowd of students looking forward to the Yummy Science Lecture at the Intrepid. The lecture, attended by the Science Research students, talked about the importance of a healthy and balanced diet as well as the science behind certain food preparation. "It was a very hands-on lecture," said Samar Syeda ’15. "This was my first time going to a lecture and I was expecting a long and boring PowerPoint, but, thankfully, that didn’t happen. We got to interact with the lecturer and take part in some activities instead of just listening to him speak." Mr. Yoses started the lecture by making a quesadilla, but instead of using cheese he used guacamole with beans and mushrooms. He touched on topics such as the discovery of the chemistry of cooking and baking and exploring new innovations in food management and sustainability. Some examples of chemistry being applied are creating blown glass like figurines out of heated sugar. Sugar, when boiled to the right temperature, can be malleable and distorted into numerous shapes. He recounted once making such figurines for a White House State Dinner.


Midwood science research students making butter from cream

After Mr. Yoses’ lecture, students were separated into two groups: scrub and butter. Students were able to create their own body products such as a pumpkin spice body scrub, as well as a honey and yogurt face mask. Butter was created by shaking heavy whipping cream for 15 to 20 minutes while songs such as "Hey Ya" by Outkast and "Shake it Off" by Taylor Swift were playing in the background. "The activities were interesting and fun, I learned a lot. I make face masks at home, and it was cool to see how other people make masks too," said Yukie Wong ’15. Along with having fun making the various items, the students learned a lot about their food choices and consumption. Mr. Yoses worked alongside Michelle Obama on her food campaign where they brought kids from the Washington, DC area to the White House garden, cultivated by Mrs. Obama and other chefs. Many topics such as alternative sources for protein were discussed, as well as the subject of genetically modified organisms (GMO). Mr. Yoses commented that it is "not really bad but not the best either." "I found it interesting that Mr. Yoses mentioned caring about food as if it’s a person," said Valeriya Falkovich ’15. "He said, ‘Talk to your food, and it will talk back." He then pointed to a slightly dried up pita bread because he left it out for a while, and sprinkled it with water to soften the texture. "This example gave me insight that food is not just something we consume, but also art that we create." Many questions surrounding the White House naturally surfaced as well. One student asked about what happens to leftovers after a state dinner. Mr. Yoses was not able to really talk about this for security reasons, but he did not say that the leftovers go to a "good place." Another student asked if there was ever a time that President Obama went to cook for himself. He recounted a time when President Obama went to the kitchen during breakfast and showed the chefs how to cook his eggs. For those wondering, according to Mr. Yoses, President Obama’s favorite dessert is fruit pie.

Charlynn Trish Ben
This article originally appeared in the December 2014 edition of Argus.

I count 42

Posted on Thursday, November 6, 2014 by for Lectures.

Midwood Science represents again at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Students heard the latest scientific research from a chemist (who spoke more like a physicist or engineer), a biologist (who reminded us that mice are not humans), and a physician (who showed us why "failed" cancer drugs are actually useful). 2014 was the ninth year of the Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture series. Midwood Science students are always present at these lectures in large numbers. This year was no exception. If you missed the lecture, you can watch the video here.

2014 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Monday, October 27, 2014 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Lectures, Seniors, Sophomores.

On Thursday, November 6, 2014, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its ninth annual Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture for high school and college students. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place from 5:30–7:30 PM on the first floor of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Rockefeller Research Laboratories building (430 East 67th Street, between York and First Avenues).

Registration is easy, but finding a seat with a good view isn’t. This event has gotten so popular that the folks at MSKCC needed to set up satellite viewing stations in adjacent conference rooms. Get there a bit early if possible. Light refreshments have traditionally been served before the lectures begin (pizza, chips, fruit, soda, coffee). Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. (Consult the Extra Credit webpage for more info.) Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Place your completed (typed) assignment in my mailbox in the Research Room at any time during the school day on Friday, November 7.

     
Craig B. Thompson     Moderator

Memorial Sloan Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.

     
Daniel A. Heller, PhD     Tiny Solutions to Big Problems: The Impact of Nanotechnologies on Cancer Research

Chemist Daniel Heller focuses on biomaterials and nanoscale engineering for molecular sensors and targeted therapeutics.

     
Danwei Huangfu, PhD     Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: A New Model for Studying Disease — Including Cancer

Developmental biologist Danwei Huangfu investigates the fundamental mechanisms that govern cell identity and how they could be exploited therapeutically to manipulate cell fates in regenerative medicine.

     
David B. Solit, MD     A Study of Extraordinary Responders: Lessons Learned

Physician-scientist David Solit studies human oncology and pathogenesis, genomics, oncogenes and tumor suppressors, cancer therapeutics, and clinical trials.

     

Great turnout at 2014 Brooklyn Frontiers in Science public lecture

Posted on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 by for Lectures.

Midwood Science Research students filled the Pfizer Auditorium at the NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering on April 3 for the 2014 Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Public Lecture. This year Professor Jacqueline K. Barton presented a lecture on Signaling through DNA. The audience listened carefully as she educated them about the capabilities of DNA and the various research being conducted.

After Professor Barton finished presenting the lecture, many Midwood students stayed to ask questions to satisfy their curiosity since they were eager to find out more about the different research being acquired in this field. It was an enriching experience for students to broaden their scientific knowledge.

Almas Shafiq
Mayor of the City of Midwood

Older Posts ☞
Midwood Science banner
Midwood Science Research Program
Glenn Elert — Coordinator

Midwood High School logoMidwood High School at Brooklyn College
Michael McDonnell — Principal
2839 Bedford Avenue
Brooklyn NY 11210
(718) 724–8500
teachers office em ail extension
Mr. Elert (Coordinator) A214 elert@ midwoodscience.org 2141
Ms. Goldstein A317 goldstein@ midwoodscience.org 3172
Ms. Mosley A200 mosley.chem@ gmail.com 2001
Ms. Sullivan A214 jsullivanbio@ gmail.com 2141
administrators office em ail extension
Mr. McDonnell (Principal) 127 mmcdonn2@ schools.nyc.gov 1270
Mr. Rosenfeld (Assistant Principal) A200 trosenf@ schools.nyc.gov 2003