The Home of Midwood Science Research

2020 Major trends in modern cancer research

Posted on Thursday, November 12, 2020 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Lectures, Seniors.

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Wednesday
18

On Wednesday, November 18, 2020, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its 15th annual Major trends in modern cancer research lecture for high and college students and their teachers. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place virtually from 6:00–7:30 PM. Registration is required.

This event is a free community education program designed to engage and inspire the next generation of progressive researchers and scientists. MSK has a wide range of opportunities to volunteer at our labs, find mentors at MSK, and potentially join our research community.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attendon the day of the event and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. Email your completed (PDF) assignment to Mr. Elert by Friday, November 20.

Portrait

Craig B. Thompson, President and CEO of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Portrait

Karuna Ganesh, MD, PhD, Medical Oncologist, and Physician-Scientist

Portrait

Justin Perry, PhD, and Immunologist

Portrait

Thomas Norman, PhD, and Systems Biologist

Midwood Science students attend virtual (and viral) Q&A at Rockefeller University

Posted on Thursday, March 19, 2020 by for Lectures.

Just because you're stuck at home avoiding a virus doesn't mean the science stops. This morning, 13 Midwood Science students and 2 teachers remotely attended a live event at The Rockefeller University. Director of Science Outreach Jeanne Garbarino and virology graduate student Gabrielle Paniccia presented a live Q&A for about 120 participants. Topic of discussion: COVID-19 Science. Here's what our students had to say about today's event.

  • The most interesting aspect is the explanation for the reason for social isolation and how difficult it is for such a social society.
  • Viruses are really old and have been around for a long time and infect many species, even bacteria. 40% of bacteria are actually destroyed by viruses each day. Viruses technically don't live so they infect other cells and "take them over".
  • The most interesting part was getting to know how N95 masks are fitted. Health workers have to test if they can taste artificial sweeteners in the air to see if things can still leak through.
  • Do you think that playing outside with your neighbor children is not a good activity during this time and also, is it reasonable for schools to open again on April 20th?
  • The virus's genetic material is RNA and it can be easily degraded. Therefore, the procedure to stabilize the RNA is complicated. This is why the testing kits are currently limited.

Was your brain as engaged as ours were at 11:00 AM on a Thursday morning?

Promotional image Someone's home office

2019 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Wednesday, October 30, 2019 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

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Wednesday
13

On Wednesday, November 13, 2019, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its fourteenth annual Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture for high school and college students. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place from 5:30–7:30 PM on the first floor of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Rockefeller Research Laboratories building (430 East 67th Street, between York and First Avenues).

Registration is preferred for this free event. Get there a bit early if possible to get a good seat. Pizza and refreshments will be served before the lecture begins. Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. (Consult the Extra Credit web page for more info.) Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Submit your completed (typed) assignment to Mr. Elert’s Research Room mailbox by Friday, November 15.

Portrait

Moderator

Memorial Sloan Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.

Portrait

Seeking order in genomic chaos: how chromosomal instability shapes cancer evolution

Radiation oncologist Samuel F. Bakhoum is working to understand more about how cancer grows and spreads.

Portrait

Metabolic Regulation of Cell Fate Decisions

Cell biologist Lydia Finley investigates how cellular metabolic pathways regulate cell fate decisions in stem cells and cancer cells.

Portrait

Immunotherapy for Patients with Lung Cancer

Medical oncologist Matthew D. Hellmann’s research focuses on developing innovative and effective ways to harness the body’s immune system to fight cancer.

The coming epidemic of neurodegenerative disease and what science is doing about it

Posted on Wednesday, March 13, 2019 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

The Brooklyn Subsection of the New York Section of the American Chemical Society is proud to present the Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Public Lecture — a free public seminar, entitled "The Coming Epidemic of Neurodegenerative Disease and What Science is Doing About It" delivered by Prof. Gregory Petsko of Weill Cornell Medical School.

This event is free and open to the public, so please let your friends know. The flyer can be downloaded here. Please register so we can plan refreshments accordingly. Check out the event on Facebook. Extra credit will be awarded to students who complete the usual requirements for attending a lecture.

Gregory Petsko

Date and Time
Thursday, March 14, 2019
5:30 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Location
Pfizer Auditorium
NYU Tandon School of  Engineering
5 MetroTech Center
Brooklyn NY 11245

RockEDU Presents: Live podcast with bacteria biologist Victor Torres

Posted on Wednesday, March 13, 2019 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

Students will join Rockefeller's Dr. Toshiki Nakashige, the host of Scientist podcast, as he interviews Victor Torres, Associate Professor of Microbiology at NYU School of Medicine. Learn about the opportunistic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, and about Victor's scientific journey, which starts in Puerto Rico.

This event is open to all high school students in the New York City area, free of charge. Register with Eventbrite for a free ticket. Extra credit will be awarded to students who complete the usual requirements for attending a lecture.

Petri dish with bacterial colonies

Date and Time
Friday, March 15, 2019
4:30 PM–6:00 PM EDT
Location
Carson Family Auditorium
The Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue
New York NY 10065

RockEDU Presents: Knowledge is power: Can you own an idea?

Posted on Friday, November 9, 2018 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Lectures, Seniors.

The Founding Fathers called for a patent system in the Constitution to "promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts." On June 19, 2018, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) issued patent number 10 million. Patent 10 million marked a historical point in the American intellectual property system dating back to the first U.S. patent, signed 228 years ago by George Washington on July 31, 1790, and issued to Samuel Hopkins for a process of making potash, an ingredient used in fertilizer. Since then, the patent system has grown with applications across all scientific disciplines. While supporters of the patent system argue that it drives innovation, others argue that the system is skewed to favor large corporations and encourages monopolies. Laura Macro, PhD, JD is an Associate at a large New York law firm and she will lead the discussion.

Dr. Macro earned her PhD in Cellular Biophysics from The Rockefeller University in 2012 and her JD from Fordham University in 2017. Dr. Macro focuses her practice on patent litigation and prosecution in the life sciences sector. Dr. Macro is well versed in a variety of technologies, and her experience includes representing a wide range of companies, from start-ups to large research universities.

This event is open to all high school students in the New York City area, free of charge. Register now! Extra credit will be awarded to students who complete the usual requirements for attending a lecture.

DATE AND TIME
Fri, November 16, 2018 4:30 PM – 6:30 PM EST
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LOCATION
Carson Family Auditorium
The Rockefeller University
1230 York Ave. New York, NY 10065
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2018 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Sunday, October 28, 2018 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

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Wednesday
7

On Wednesday, November 7, 2018, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its twelfth annual Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture for high school and college students. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place from 5:30–7:30 PM on the first floor of Memorial Sloan Kettering's Rockefeller Research Laboratories building (430 East 67th Street, between York and First Avenues).

Registration is preferred for this free event. Get there a bit early if possible to get a good seat. Pizza and refreshments will be served before the lecture begins. Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. (Consult the Extra Credit web page for more info.) Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Submit your completed (typed) assignment to Mr. Elert's Research Room mailbox by Friday, November 9.

Portrait Moderator

Memorial Sloan Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.

Portrait T-Cell Immunotherapy for Solid Tumors

Physician-scientist Prasad Adusumilli studies tumor immunology and the development of T-cell-mediated immunotherapy for thoracic malignancies and pleural-based diseases.

Portrait Big Ideas in Small Spaces: Brain Tumor Microenvironments

Physician-scientist Adrienne Boire studies metastasis to the central nervous system.

Portrait Decoding the Complexity of the Cancer Cell Society

Cancer biologist Tuomas Tammela investigates cellular heterogeneity in lung, pancreatic and colon cancers.

Manipulating the immune system to control cancer

Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2018 by for Juniors, Lectures, Seniors.

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Wednesday
25

Learn how the immune system can be harnessed to fight cancer. This talk is part of the quarterly Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) Student Seminar Series, created to share expertise with students, communicate the excitement of cancer research, and create a learning community at MSK. Students grade 9–12 or college are invited, and they can bring classmates. Date & Time: Wednesday, April 25, 2018, 5:00–6:30 PM. Location: Zuckerman Auditorium, 417 East 68th Street (note that this is not the usual location we go to for MSK lectures).

Portrait How the Immune System Can Be Manipulated to Control Cancer

Michael A. Postow, MD is part of the Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Service and the The Jedd Wolchok Lab. He has an interest in developing clinical trials for patients with melanoma involving immunotherapeutic strategies. His specific areas of interest include studying the immunologic effects of radiotherapy and characterizing pharmacodynamic biomarkers associated with ipilimumab outcomes.

RockEDU Presents: Don’t Stress It with Dr. Katie Davis

Posted on Monday, April 16, 2018 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Lectures, Seniors.

Have you ever felt overwhelmed by your school work? As a practicing clinical psychiatrist, Dr. Davis will discuss best practices that can help reduce school-related anxieties. She will speak about her fMRI research on the connection between learning disorders and anxiety, and share strategies to reduce school-related anxiety to improve studying.

This event is a part of Rockefeller University’s RockEDU science outreach program. Register through Eventbrite now. Free for high school students and teachers.

DATE AND TIME
Friday, April 20, 2018
4:30 PM–6:00 PM EDT
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LOCATION
Carson Family Auditorium
The Rockefeller University
1230 York Ave
New York, NY 10065

Stressed out cat

Public Lecture: A-to-I RNA Editing – Common, Hidden Mutations

Posted on Thursday, December 14, 2017 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

Dr. Erez Levanon from the Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel will be presenting a public lecture on A-to-I RNA editing at the New York Genome Center in Tribeca this Monday, December 18 from 4:00–5:30.

Dr. Erez Levanon in his lab

"The role of RNA modifications in gene regulation is becoming increasingly appreciated. RNA editing, specifically A-to-I editing by ADAR enzymes, is unique in altering not only the fate of the RNA molecule, but also the genetic information it contains (recoding)."

Ms. Ross is awarding extra credit to all Advanced Placement Biology students that attend. Science Research students will also receive extra credit if they attend and complete the usual assignment. Due to the technical nature of the lecture, only students who have completed or are currently enrolled in AP Bio may attend. Register online through the Eventbrite website. In addition, please email a screen shot of your ticket along with a photo of yourself at the event to Mr. Elert.

2017 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Monday, October 30, 2017 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

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Wednesday
8

On Wednesday, November 8, 2017, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its twelfth annual Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture for high school and college students. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place from 5:30–7:30 PM on the first floor of Memorial Sloan Kettering's Rockefeller Research Laboratories building (430 East 67th Street, between York and First Avenues).

Registration is preferred for this free event. Get there a bit early if possible to get a good seat. Pizza and refreshments will be served before the lecture beginz. Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. (Consult the Extra Credit webpage for more info.) Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Submit your completed (typed) assignment to Mr. Elert's Research Room mailbox by Friday, November 10.

Portrait Moderator

Memorial Sloan Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.

Portrait Harnessing the Immune System to Fight Cancer: Rewiring the Molecular Circuitry of T cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

Cancer immunologist Andrea Schietinger investigates immune responses to cancer, molecular mechanisms underlying tumor-induced T cell dysfunction, and new approaches for cancer immunotherapy.

Portrait Develop the Organism, Kill the Cancer: Understanding the Evolutionary Origins of New Forms of Cell Death and Their Effects on Cancer

Cell biologisy Michael H. Overholtzer studies the mechanisms of tumor initiation and progression, cell adhesion, and cell death.

Portrait Shedding Light on Inflammation: Imaging White Blood Cell Recruitment in Live Zebrafish

Cell biologist Philipp M. Niethammer investigates wound responses using advanced imaging approaches in zebrafish.

Flatland: The new world of two-dimensional materials

Posted on Thursday, April 20, 2017 by for Lectures.

The Brooklyn Subsection of the American Chemical Society and the NYU Tandon School of Engineering present a free lecture to the public. Flatland: The new world of two-dimensional materials.

Dr. James Hone
Flatland: The new world of two-dimensional materials
Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Lecture
Thursday, May 4, 2017, 5:30–7:00 PM
Pfizer Auditorium
NYU Tandon School of Engineering
5 Metrotech Center
Brooklyn, NY 11201

 

James Hone is currently Wang Fong-Jen Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Columbia University, and director of PAS3, Columbia’s Materials Science Research and Engineering Center (MRSEC). He received his PhD in experimental condensed matter physics from UC Berkeley in 1998, and did postdoctoral work at the University of Pennsylvania and Caltech, where he was a Millikan Fellow. He joined the Columbia faculty in 2003. His current research interests include synthesis, characterization, manipulation, and applications of graphene and other 2D materials; nanomechanical devices; and nanobiology.

If you are interested in attending, please register here. Midwood Science Research students will receive extra credit if they attend and submit the public lecture assignment to Mr. Elert the day after. An attendance photo will also be taken.

2017 Talking Science at The Rockefeller University

Posted on Monday, November 28, 2016 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

Let me know if you're interested in attending this event. I will register you on Thursday. A link to an online form has been emailed to you. Students are not allowed to register themselves. Please note the date and time. Do not sign up if there is even the slightest chance you will back out. Space is very limited.

Banner for Talking Science 2017
Save the Date

The Rockefeller University


invites your school to participate in

Talking Science

Spend a day on campus at The Rockefeller University with

Jean-Laurent Casanova, M.D., Ph.D.

pioneering immunologist, pediatrician, and geneticist, to learn how genetics plays a major role in human susceptibility to infectious diseases.


Are Infectious Diseases Only Infectious?

Saturday, January 7, 2017

The Rockefeller University
Caspary Auditorium
1230 York Avenue at East 66th Street
New York, NY 10065

Talking Science is intended for high school students (preferably juniors and seniors) with a strong interest in science and their teachers only. Student attendance is limited to ten per school. Registration is required and will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. This event is provided at no cost to the school or students.

Registration opens on Thursday, December 1, 2016. Information packets will be mailed to your school in advance of the registration open date.


giveandjoin.rockefeller.edu/talkingscience

GoViral at The Rockefeller University

Posted on Sunday, October 16, 2016 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Lectures, Seniors, Sophomores.

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   Friday   
4

Come learn about viruses and other infectious diseases at a new lecture series at The Rockefeller University on Friday, November 4, 2016 from 4:30–6:30 PM. GoViral Mapping the Spread of Viruses in the Community is lecture-discussion presented by Sofia Ahsanuddin. Ms. Ahsanuddin is a researcher in the Chunra Lab at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering and the Mason Lab at Weill Cornell Medical College and a graduate of the Macaulay Honors College at Brooklyn College. She has been instrumental in a series of related public health projects: Pathomap, MetaSUB, and GoViral.

Pathomap is a research project by Weill Cornell Medical College to study the microbiome and metagenome of the built environment of NYC. Pathomap has since expanded into MetaSUB, a global initiative in 39 cities on six continents. "From the sidewalk to the subway pole, our cities are living laboratories of genetic information." For a quick (11 minute) summary of Pathomap and MetaSUB, watch Ms. Ahsanuddin’s 2015 TEDxCUNY presentation.

Screen shot
Cracking the Genetic Code of Our Cities
on YouTube

GoViral is a community participatory research study that aims to map, monitor and measure the spread of acute respiratory infections. Participants sign up on goviralstudy.com and record survey data weekly, including information about any symptoms they may have. They are also sent a respiratory sample kit that is easy to use at home and ship back to the lab. A PCR respiratory assay is then performed to determine which viruses are present in the participant’s sample. Data gathered are presented on the project’s website in an interactive, visual display that can be used by participant’s to learn more about their own health and for researchers to learn more about public health and epidemiology (the spread of infectious diseases).

Screen shot
GoViral Introductory Video
on Vimeo

LAB Out Loud is The Rockefeller University’s interactive, science-cafe-style discussion series designed specifically for high school students. During these events, high-profile scientists from New York City will present their cutting-edge research to a high school student audience, allowing plenty of time for questions. After the talk, students are invited to network with each other, and with a variety local scientists over snacks and refreshments.

Ms. Mosley and I have obtained 35 tickets each for this event. Students cannot register on their own or show up without a ticket. Details on how to obtain a ticket from one of us will follow in a subsequent email.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment. Submit your completed (typed) assignment to your supervising teacher at any time during the school day on Monday, November 7.

GoViral logo Pathomap screenshot MetaSUB logo

2016 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Sunday, October 16, 2016 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Lectures, Seniors, Sophomores.

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Thursday
3

On Thursday, November 3, 2016, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its eleventh annual Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture for high school and college students. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place from 5:30–7:30 PM on the first floor of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Rockefeller Research Laboratories building (430 East 67th Street, between York and First Avenues).

Registration is easy, but finding a seat with a good view isn’t. This event has gotten so popular that the folks at MSKCC needed to set up satellite viewing stations in adjacent conference rooms. Get there a bit early if possible. Light refreshments have traditionally been served before the lectures begin (pizza, chips, fruit, soda, coffee). Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. (Consult the Extra Credit webpage for more info.) Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Submit your completed (typed) assignment to your supervising teacher at any time during the school day on Monday, November 7.

Portrait Moderator

Memorial Sloan Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.

Portrait Hijacking the Genes: How Transcription Factors Promote Tumor Formation

Physician-scientist Yu Chen studies the role of transcription factors that are critical for prostate cancer development.

Portrait Ion Channels in Calcium Signaling: Understanding the Atomic and Chemical Mechanisms

Structural biologist Stephen Long studies the mechanisms of ion channels and enzymatic membrane proteins using a combination of scientific approaches.

Portrait Getting to Know Cancer: Using the Genome to Understand How Cancer Behaves

Molecular geneticist Elli Papaemmanuil studies patient data from clinical trials to explore how the genes in leukemia and other cancers affect disease progression and clinical outcomes.

Meet with FAA engineers

Posted on Sunday, February 21, 2016 by for Everyone, Lectures.

In honor of Engineers’ Week, representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Terminal Design Center will be at Midwood on Tuesday, February 23, 2016. Discussion will center on careers in engineering and what it’s like to work for the federal government. The meeting will take place in room A117 during period 9. All students are welcome to attend.

Engineer's Week banner FAA seal

2016 Talking Science

Posted on Sunday, November 29, 2015 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

Contact me immediately if you wish to attend this lecture AND are available. It runs from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM on the second Saturday in January. Space is limited and I must register early on Tuesday, December 1. Last year, we were only allowed 2 students because I waited until the end of the day to register. It filled up that quickly. Because demand is so high for this event, students who register and don’t show up (thus locking out other students) will have their grade lowered.

banner for Talking Science 2016
Save the Date

The Rockefeller University
invites your school to participate in

Talking science

Spend a day on campus at The Rockefeller University with preeminent biochemist and physician,Thomas P. Sakmar, M.D., to learn the science of drug discovery, and how new technology is transforming medicine.

Drug Discovery 101:
Precision Medicine for the 21st Century

Saturday, January 9, 2016 

   

The Rockefeller University
Caspary Auditorium
1230 York Avenue at East 66th Street
New York, NY 10065

   

Talking Science is intended for high school students only (preferably juniors and seniors) with a strong interest in science. Student attendance is limited to ten per school. Registration is required and will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. This event is provided at no cost to the school or students.

Registration opens on Tuesday, December 1, 2015. Information packets will be mailed to your school in advance of the registration open date.

www.rockefeller.edu/talkingscience

I count 48

Posted on Tuesday, November 10, 2015 by for Lectures.

Midwood Science was well represented at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) for the 10th annual lectures on Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research. This year’s lectures were more about general biomedical research than specific research on cancer. Dr. Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis (or "Anna-Kat" as the President of MSKCC Craig B. Thompson called her) talked about her amazing imaging technique that allowed her to make 3D movies of cells in developing mouse embryos. Dr. Cole Haynes taught us how mitochondria (the cell’s powerhouses) are affected by many different diseases from cancers to bacterial infections. Closing the show was Dr. Joao Xavier, a systems biologist who talked about everything from the growth of biofilms, to the spread of cancers, to the microbiome living inside our guts. "It’s about finding common principles in biology," he said.

Midwood was the best represented school at the event with what looks like 48 students in attendance. I know that it may seem like I am always writing about how some event is our "best" or "biggest" ever, but this honestly is our biggest year ever at MSKCC. The lectures were great, the students were great, and the pizza was pretty good too.

Public Lectures for the Fall Semester

Posted on Sunday, November 8, 2015 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

Tue. Nov.
10
What: Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research
 
When: Tuesday, November 10, 2015, 5:30–7:30
 
Where: Rockefeller Labs
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
430 E 67th St (between First and York Avenues)
New Work NY 10065
 
Registration: Now!
   
Thu. Dec.
3
What: Brooklyn Frontiers in Science (Art & Chemistry)
 
When: Thursday, December 3, 2015, 5:30–7:00
 
Where: Pfizer Auditorium
NYU Tandon School of Engineering
5 Metrotech Center
Brooklyn NY 11201
 
Registration: Anytime before the end of November.
   
Sat. Jan.
9
What: Talking Science (Medicine)
 
When: Saturday, January 9, 2016,10:00–3:00
 
Where: Caspary Auditorium
The Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue at East 66th Street
New York NY 10065
 
Registration: Opens on Tuesday, December 1. Limited to 10 students.
   

2015 Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Public Lecture

Posted on Friday, November 6, 2015 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

The Brooklyn Subsection of the American Chemical Society and the NYU Tandon School of Engineering present a free lecture to the public. The Science of Art and Color: Four thousand years of experimentation and discovery through the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Dr. Marco Leona
The Science of Art and Color
Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Lecture
Thursday, December 3, 2015, 5:30–7:00 PM
Pfizer Auditorium
NYU Tandon School of Engineering
5 Metrotech Center
Brooklyn, NY 11201
 

Dr. Marco Leona is the David H. Koch Scientist in Charge in the Department of Scientific Research at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

If you are interested in attending, please register here. Midwood Science Research students will receive extra credit if they attend and submit the public lecture assignment to Mr. Elert the day after. An attendance photo will also be taken.

Juniors interested in chemistry should consider using this scientific paper by Dr. Leona for Assignment 4: Analysis of a Contemporary Paper.

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