The Home of Midwood Science Research

Manipulating the immune system to control cancer

Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2018 by for Juniors, Lectures, Seniors.

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Wednesday
25

Learn how the immune system can be harnessed to fight cancer. This talk is part of the quarterly Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) Student Seminar Series, created to share expertise with students, communicate the excitement of cancer research, and create a learning community at MSK. Students grade 9–12 or college are invited, and they can bring classmates. Date & Time: Wednesday, April 25, 2018, 5:00–6:30 PM. Location: Zuckerman Auditorium, 417 East 68th Street (note that this is not the usual location we go to for MSK lectures).

Portrait How the Immune System Can Be Manipulated to Control Cancer

Michael A. Postow, MD is part of the Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Service and the The Jedd Wolchok Lab. He has an interest in developing clinical trials for patients with melanoma involving immunotherapeutic strategies. His specific areas of interest include studying the immunologic effects of radiotherapy and characterizing pharmacodynamic biomarkers associated with ipilimumab outcomes.

RockEDU Presents: Don’t Stress It with Dr. Katie Davis

Posted on Monday, April 16, 2018 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Lectures, Seniors.

Have you ever felt overwhelmed by your school work? As a practicing clinical psychiatrist, Dr. Davis will discuss best practices that can help reduce school-related anxieties. She will speak about her fMRI research on the connection between learning disorders and anxiety, and share strategies to reduce school-related anxiety to improve studying.

This event is a part of Rockefeller University’s RockEDU science outreach program. Register through Eventbrite now. Free for high school students and teachers.

DATE AND TIME
Friday, April 20, 2018
4:30 PM–6:00 PM EDT
Add to your calendar
 
LOCATION
Carson Family Auditorium
The Rockefeller University
1230 York Ave
New York, NY 10065

Stressed out cat

Public Lecture: A-to-I RNA Editing – Common, Hidden Mutations

Posted on Thursday, December 14, 2017 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

Dr. Erez Levanon from the Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel will be presenting a public lecture on A-to-I RNA editing at the New York Genome Center in Tribeca this Monday, December 18 from 4:00–5:30.

Dr. Erez Levanon in his lab

"The role of RNA modifications in gene regulation is becoming increasingly appreciated. RNA editing, specifically A-to-I editing by ADAR enzymes, is unique in altering not only the fate of the RNA molecule, but also the genetic information it contains (recoding)."

Ms. Ross is awarding extra credit to all Advanced Placement Biology students that attend. Science Research students will also receive extra credit if they attend and complete the usual assignment. Due to the technical nature of the lecture, only students who have completed or are currently enrolled in AP Bio may attend. Register online through the Eventbrite website. In addition, please email a screen shot of your ticket along with a photo of yourself at the event to Mr. Elert.

2017 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Monday, October 30, 2017 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

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Wednesday
8

On Wednesday, November 8, 2017, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its twelfth annual Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture for high school and college students. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place from 5:30–7:30 PM on the first floor of Memorial Sloan Kettering's Rockefeller Research Laboratories building (430 East 67th Street, between York and First Avenues).

Registration is preferred for this free event. Get there a bit early if possible to get a good seat. Pizza and refreshments will be served before the lecture beginz. Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. (Consult the Extra Credit webpage for more info.) Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Submit your completed (typed) assignment to Mr. Elert's Research Room mailbox by Friday, November 10.

Portrait Moderator

Memorial Sloan Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.

Portrait Harnessing the Immune System to Fight Cancer: Rewiring the Molecular Circuitry of T cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

Cancer immunologist Andrea Schietinger investigates immune responses to cancer, molecular mechanisms underlying tumor-induced T cell dysfunction, and new approaches for cancer immunotherapy.

Portrait Develop the Organism, Kill the Cancer: Understanding the Evolutionary Origins of New Forms of Cell Death and Their Effects on Cancer

Cell biologisy Michael H. Overholtzer studies the mechanisms of tumor initiation and progression, cell adhesion, and cell death.

Portrait Shedding Light on Inflammation: Imaging White Blood Cell Recruitment in Live Zebrafish

Cell biologist Philipp M. Niethammer investigates wound responses using advanced imaging approaches in zebrafish.

Flatland: The new world of two-dimensional materials

Posted on Thursday, April 20, 2017 by for Lectures.

The Brooklyn Subsection of the American Chemical Society and the NYU Tandon School of Engineering present a free lecture to the public. Flatland: The new world of two-dimensional materials.

Dr. James Hone
Flatland: The new world of two-dimensional materials
Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Lecture
Thursday, May 4, 2017, 5:30–7:00 PM
Pfizer Auditorium
NYU Tandon School of Engineering
5 Metrotech Center
Brooklyn, NY 11201

 

James Hone is currently Wang Fong-Jen Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Columbia University, and director of PAS3, Columbia’s Materials Science Research and Engineering Center (MRSEC). He received his PhD in experimental condensed matter physics from UC Berkeley in 1998, and did postdoctoral work at the University of Pennsylvania and Caltech, where he was a Millikan Fellow. He joined the Columbia faculty in 2003. His current research interests include synthesis, characterization, manipulation, and applications of graphene and other 2D materials; nanomechanical devices; and nanobiology.

If you are interested in attending, please register here. Midwood Science Research students will receive extra credit if they attend and submit the public lecture assignment to Mr. Elert the day after. An attendance photo will also be taken.

2017 Talking Science at The Rockefeller University

Posted on Monday, November 28, 2016 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

Let me know if you're interested in attending this event. I will register you on Thursday. A link to an online form has been emailed to you. Students are not allowed to register themselves. Please note the date and time. Do not sign up if there is even the slightest chance you will back out. Space is very limited.

Banner for Talking Science 2017
Save the Date

The Rockefeller University


invites your school to participate in

Talking Science

Spend a day on campus at The Rockefeller University with

Jean-Laurent Casanova, M.D., Ph.D.

pioneering immunologist, pediatrician, and geneticist, to learn how genetics plays a major role in human susceptibility to infectious diseases.


Are Infectious Diseases Only Infectious?

Saturday, January 7, 2017

The Rockefeller University
Caspary Auditorium
1230 York Avenue at East 66th Street
New York, NY 10065

Talking Science is intended for high school students (preferably juniors and seniors) with a strong interest in science and their teachers only. Student attendance is limited to ten per school. Registration is required and will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. This event is provided at no cost to the school or students.

Registration opens on Thursday, December 1, 2016. Information packets will be mailed to your school in advance of the registration open date.


giveandjoin.rockefeller.edu/talkingscience

GoViral at The Rockefeller University

Posted on Sunday, October 16, 2016 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Lectures, Seniors, Sophomores.

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   Friday   
4

Come learn about viruses and other infectious diseases at a new lecture series at The Rockefeller University on Friday, November 4, 2016 from 4:30–6:30 PM. GoViral Mapping the Spread of Viruses in the Community is lecture-discussion presented by Sofia Ahsanuddin. Ms. Ahsanuddin is a researcher in the Chunra Lab at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering and the Mason Lab at Weill Cornell Medical College and a graduate of the Macaulay Honors College at Brooklyn College. She has been instrumental in a series of related public health projects: Pathomap, MetaSUB, and GoViral.

Pathomap is a research project by Weill Cornell Medical College to study the microbiome and metagenome of the built environment of NYC. Pathomap has since expanded into MetaSUB, a global initiative in 39 cities on six continents. "From the sidewalk to the subway pole, our cities are living laboratories of genetic information." For a quick (11 minute) summary of Pathomap and MetaSUB, watch Ms. Ahsanuddin’s 2015 TEDxCUNY presentation.

Screen shot
Cracking the Genetic Code of Our Cities
on YouTube

GoViral is a community participatory research study that aims to map, monitor and measure the spread of acute respiratory infections. Participants sign up on goviralstudy.com and record survey data weekly, including information about any symptoms they may have. They are also sent a respiratory sample kit that is easy to use at home and ship back to the lab. A PCR respiratory assay is then performed to determine which viruses are present in the participant’s sample. Data gathered are presented on the project’s website in an interactive, visual display that can be used by participant’s to learn more about their own health and for researchers to learn more about public health and epidemiology (the spread of infectious diseases).

Screen shot
GoViral Introductory Video
on Vimeo

LAB Out Loud is The Rockefeller University’s interactive, science-cafe-style discussion series designed specifically for high school students. During these events, high-profile scientists from New York City will present their cutting-edge research to a high school student audience, allowing plenty of time for questions. After the talk, students are invited to network with each other, and with a variety local scientists over snacks and refreshments.

Ms. Mosley and I have obtained 35 tickets each for this event. Students cannot register on their own or show up without a ticket. Details on how to obtain a ticket from one of us will follow in a subsequent email.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment. Submit your completed (typed) assignment to your supervising teacher at any time during the school day on Monday, November 7.

GoViral logo Pathomap screenshot MetaSUB logo

2016 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Sunday, October 16, 2016 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Lectures, Seniors, Sophomores.

Add to Calendar
Thursday
3

On Thursday, November 3, 2016, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its eleventh annual Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture for high school and college students. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place from 5:30–7:30 PM on the first floor of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Rockefeller Research Laboratories building (430 East 67th Street, between York and First Avenues).

Registration is easy, but finding a seat with a good view isn’t. This event has gotten so popular that the folks at MSKCC needed to set up satellite viewing stations in adjacent conference rooms. Get there a bit early if possible. Light refreshments have traditionally been served before the lectures begin (pizza, chips, fruit, soda, coffee). Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. (Consult the Extra Credit webpage for more info.) Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Submit your completed (typed) assignment to your supervising teacher at any time during the school day on Monday, November 7.

Portrait Moderator

Memorial Sloan Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.

Portrait Hijacking the Genes: How Transcription Factors Promote Tumor Formation

Physician-scientist Yu Chen studies the role of transcription factors that are critical for prostate cancer development.

Portrait Ion Channels in Calcium Signaling: Understanding the Atomic and Chemical Mechanisms

Structural biologist Stephen Long studies the mechanisms of ion channels and enzymatic membrane proteins using a combination of scientific approaches.

Portrait Getting to Know Cancer: Using the Genome to Understand How Cancer Behaves

Molecular geneticist Elli Papaemmanuil studies patient data from clinical trials to explore how the genes in leukemia and other cancers affect disease progression and clinical outcomes.

Meet with FAA engineers

Posted on Sunday, February 21, 2016 by for Everyone, Lectures.

In honor of Engineers’ Week, representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Terminal Design Center will be at Midwood on Tuesday, February 23, 2016. Discussion will center on careers in engineering and what it’s like to work for the federal government. The meeting will take place in room A117 during period 9. All students are welcome to attend.

Engineer's Week banner FAA seal

2016 Talking Science

Posted on Sunday, November 29, 2015 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

Contact me immediately if you wish to attend this lecture AND are available. It runs from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM on the second Saturday in January. Space is limited and I must register early on Tuesday, December 1. Last year, we were only allowed 2 students because I waited until the end of the day to register. It filled up that quickly. Because demand is so high for this event, students who register and don’t show up (thus locking out other students) will have their grade lowered.

banner for Talking Science 2016
Save the Date

The Rockefeller University
invites your school to participate in

Talking science

Spend a day on campus at The Rockefeller University with preeminent biochemist and physician,Thomas P. Sakmar, M.D., to learn the science of drug discovery, and how new technology is transforming medicine.

Drug Discovery 101:
Precision Medicine for the 21st Century

Saturday, January 9, 2016 

   

The Rockefeller University
Caspary Auditorium
1230 York Avenue at East 66th Street
New York, NY 10065

   

Talking Science is intended for high school students only (preferably juniors and seniors) with a strong interest in science. Student attendance is limited to ten per school. Registration is required and will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. This event is provided at no cost to the school or students.

Registration opens on Tuesday, December 1, 2015. Information packets will be mailed to your school in advance of the registration open date.

www.rockefeller.edu/talkingscience

I count 48

Posted on Tuesday, November 10, 2015 by for Lectures.

Midwood Science was well represented at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) for the 10th annual lectures on Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research. This year’s lectures were more about general biomedical research than specific research on cancer. Dr. Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis (or "Anna-Kat" as the President of MSKCC Craig B. Thompson called her) talked about her amazing imaging technique that allowed her to make 3D movies of cells in developing mouse embryos. Dr. Cole Haynes taught us how mitochondria (the cell’s powerhouses) are affected by many different diseases from cancers to bacterial infections. Closing the show was Dr. Joao Xavier, a systems biologist who talked about everything from the growth of biofilms, to the spread of cancers, to the microbiome living inside our guts. "It’s about finding common principles in biology," he said.

Midwood was the best represented school at the event with what looks like 48 students in attendance. I know that it may seem like I am always writing about how some event is our "best" or "biggest" ever, but this honestly is our biggest year ever at MSKCC. The lectures were great, the students were great, and the pizza was pretty good too.

Public Lectures for the Fall Semester

Posted on Sunday, November 8, 2015 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

Tue. Nov.
10
What: Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research
 
When: Tuesday, November 10, 2015, 5:30–7:30
 
Where: Rockefeller Labs
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
430 E 67th St (between First and York Avenues)
New Work NY 10065
 
Registration: Now!
   
Thu. Dec.
3
What: Brooklyn Frontiers in Science (Art & Chemistry)
 
When: Thursday, December 3, 2015, 5:30–7:00
 
Where: Pfizer Auditorium
NYU Tandon School of Engineering
5 Metrotech Center
Brooklyn NY 11201
 
Registration: Anytime before the end of November.
   
Sat. Jan.
9
What: Talking Science (Medicine)
 
When: Saturday, January 9, 2016,10:00–3:00
 
Where: Caspary Auditorium
The Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue at East 66th Street
New York NY 10065
 
Registration: Opens on Tuesday, December 1. Limited to 10 students.
   

2015 Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Public Lecture

Posted on Friday, November 6, 2015 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

The Brooklyn Subsection of the American Chemical Society and the NYU Tandon School of Engineering present a free lecture to the public. The Science of Art and Color: Four thousand years of experimentation and discovery through the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Dr. Marco Leona
The Science of Art and Color
Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Lecture
Thursday, December 3, 2015, 5:30–7:00 PM
Pfizer Auditorium
NYU Tandon School of Engineering
5 Metrotech Center
Brooklyn, NY 11201
 

Dr. Marco Leona is the David H. Koch Scientist in Charge in the Department of Scientific Research at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

If you are interested in attending, please register here. Midwood Science Research students will receive extra credit if they attend and submit the public lecture assignment to Mr. Elert the day after. An attendance photo will also be taken.

Juniors interested in chemistry should consider using this scientific paper by Dr. Leona for Assignment 4: Analysis of a Contemporary Paper.

2015 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Monday, October 26, 2015 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

On Tuesday, November 10, 2015, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its tenth annual Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture for high school and college students. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place from 5:30–7:30 PM on the first floor of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Rockefeller Research Laboratories building (430 East 67th Street, between York and First Avenues).

Registration is easy, but finding a seat with a good view isn’t. This event has gotten so popular that the folks at MSKCC needed to set up satellite viewing stations in adjacent conference rooms. Get there a bit early if possible. Light refreshments have traditionally been served before the lectures begin (pizza, chips, fruit, soda, coffee). Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. (Consult the Extra Credit webpage for more info.) Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Place your completed (typed) assignment in my mailbox in the Research Room at any time during the school day on Thursday, November 12.

   
Craig B. Thompson Moderator

Memorial Sloan Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.

   
Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis, PhD, Developmental Biologist In the Beginning: What Embryos Teach Us about How Cells Decide What They Want to Be

Developmental biologist Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis studies pluripotency, cell lineage commitment, tissue patterning, and morphogenesis in the early mammalian embryo.

   
Cole Haynes, PhD, Cell Biology Program Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Its Consequences: From Aging to Cancer

Cell biologist Cole Haynes focuses on the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial function during development, aging, and cancer cell growth.

   
Joao Xavier, PhD, Computational Biology Program Ecology of the Microbiome: What the Gut Microbiota Reveals about Human Illness

Computational biologist Joao Xavier studies computer models and quantitative experiments of biofilm and cancer growth.

   

Research students attend Yummy Science lecture

Posted on Tuesday, January 6, 2015 by for Lectures, Media.

"You’re not talking to your tomatoes," said Bill Yoses, former White House Pastry Chef to a crowd of students looking forward to the Yummy Science Lecture at the Intrepid. The lecture, attended by the Science Research students, talked about the importance of a healthy and balanced diet as well as the science behind certain food preparation. "It was a very hands-on lecture," said Samar Syeda ’15. "This was my first time going to a lecture and I was expecting a long and boring PowerPoint, but, thankfully, that didn’t happen. We got to interact with the lecturer and take part in some activities instead of just listening to him speak." Mr. Yoses started the lecture by making a quesadilla, but instead of using cheese he used guacamole with beans and mushrooms. He touched on topics such as the discovery of the chemistry of cooking and baking and exploring new innovations in food management and sustainability. Some examples of chemistry being applied are creating blown glass like figurines out of heated sugar. Sugar, when boiled to the right temperature, can be malleable and distorted into numerous shapes. He recounted once making such figurines for a White House State Dinner.


Midwood science research students making butter from cream

After Mr. Yoses’ lecture, students were separated into two groups: scrub and butter. Students were able to create their own body products such as a pumpkin spice body scrub, as well as a honey and yogurt face mask. Butter was created by shaking heavy whipping cream for 15 to 20 minutes while songs such as "Hey Ya" by Outkast and "Shake it Off" by Taylor Swift were playing in the background. "The activities were interesting and fun, I learned a lot. I make face masks at home, and it was cool to see how other people make masks too," said Yukie Wong ’15. Along with having fun making the various items, the students learned a lot about their food choices and consumption. Mr. Yoses worked alongside Michelle Obama on her food campaign where they brought kids from the Washington, DC area to the White House garden, cultivated by Mrs. Obama and other chefs. Many topics such as alternative sources for protein were discussed, as well as the subject of genetically modified organisms (GMO). Mr. Yoses commented that it is "not really bad but not the best either." "I found it interesting that Mr. Yoses mentioned caring about food as if it’s a person," said Valeriya Falkovich ’15. "He said, ‘Talk to your food, and it will talk back." He then pointed to a slightly dried up pita bread because he left it out for a while, and sprinkled it with water to soften the texture. "This example gave me insight that food is not just something we consume, but also art that we create." Many questions surrounding the White House naturally surfaced as well. One student asked about what happens to leftovers after a state dinner. Mr. Yoses was not able to really talk about this for security reasons, but he did not say that the leftovers go to a "good place." Another student asked if there was ever a time that President Obama went to cook for himself. He recounted a time when President Obama went to the kitchen during breakfast and showed the chefs how to cook his eggs. For those wondering, according to Mr. Yoses, President Obama’s favorite dessert is fruit pie.

Charlynn Trish Ben
This article originally appeared in the December 2014 edition of Argus.

I count 42

Posted on Thursday, November 6, 2014 by for Lectures.

Midwood Science represents again at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Students heard the latest scientific research from a chemist (who spoke more like a physicist or engineer), a biologist (who reminded us that mice are not humans), and a physician (who showed us why "failed" cancer drugs are actually useful). 2014 was the ninth year of the Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture series. Midwood Science students are always present at these lectures in large numbers. This year was no exception. If you missed the lecture, you can watch the video here.

2014 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Monday, October 27, 2014 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Lectures, Seniors, Sophomores.

On Thursday, November 6, 2014, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its ninth annual Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture for high school and college students. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place from 5:30–7:30 PM on the first floor of Memorial Sloan Kettering's Rockefeller Research Laboratories building (430 East 67th Street, between York and First Avenues).

Registration is easy, but finding a seat with a good view isn't. This event has gotten so popular that the folks at MSKCC needed to set up satellite viewing stations in adjacent conference rooms. Get there a bit early if possible. Light refreshments have traditionally been served before the lectures begin (pizza, chips, fruit, soda, coffee). Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. (Consult the Extra Credit webpage for more info.) Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Place your completed (typed) assignment in my mailbox in the Research Room at any time during the school day on Friday, November 7.

     
Craig B. Thompson   Moderator

Memorial Sloan Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.
     
Daniel A. Heller, PhD   Tiny Solutions to Big Problems: The Impact of Nanotechnologies on Cancer Research

Chemist Daniel Heller focuses on biomaterials and nanoscale engineering for molecular sensors and targeted therapeutics.
     
Danwei Huangfu, PhD   Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: A New Model for Studying Disease — Including Cancer

Developmental biologist Danwei Huangfu investigates the fundamental mechanisms that govern cell identity and how they could be exploited therapeutically to manipulate cell fates in regenerative medicine.
     
David B. Solit, MD   A Study of Extraordinary Responders: Lessons Learned

Physician-scientist David Solit studies human oncology and pathogenesis, genomics, oncogenes and tumor suppressors, cancer therapeutics, and clinical trials.
     

Great turnout at 2014 Brooklyn Frontiers in Science public lecture

Posted on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 by for Lectures.

Midwood Science Research students filled the Pfizer Auditorium at the NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering on April 3 for the 2014 Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Public Lecture. This year Professor Jacqueline K. Barton presented a lecture on Signaling through DNA. The audience listened carefully as she educated them about the capabilities of DNA and the various research being conducted.

After Professor Barton finished presenting the lecture, many Midwood students stayed to ask questions to satisfy their curiosity since they were eager to find out more about the different research being acquired in this field. It was an enriching experience for students to broaden their scientific knowledge.

Almas Shafiq
Mayor of the City of Midwood

2014 Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Public Lecture

Posted on Sunday, March 30, 2014 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

The Brooklyn Subsection of the American Chemical Society and the NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering present a free lecture to the public.

Professor Jacqueline K. Barton
Signaling through DNA
Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Lecture

Thursday, April 3, 2014
5:30–7:00 PM

Pfizer Auditorium
NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering
5 Metrotech Center
Brooklyn, NY 11201

We think of the DNA double helix as the library of the cell, encoding all that we are. But DNA can also serve as a conduit for the flow of electrons, a medium for signaling. Like a stack of copper pennies, the stack of DNA base pairs is conductive. Recent experiments have shown that DNA can serve as a conduit for the transport of electrons over long molecular distances. We can use this to chemistry design sensitive DNA-based diagnostic sensors. Nature uses this chemistry to find where DNA is damaged and in need of repair — an important mechanism in maintaining our genetic library against the damage associated with aging, cancer, and oxidative stress.

Dr. Jacqueline K. Barton is the Arthur and Marian Hanisch Memorial Professor of Chemistry and Chair of the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. She is a native New Yorker. Barton was awarded the A.B. summa cum laude at Barnard College in 1974 and a Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry at Columbia University in 1978 in the laboratory of Stephen J. Lippard. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Bell Laboratories and Yale University with Robert G. Shulman, she became an assistant professor at Hunter College. In 1983, she returned to Columbia University, becoming an professor of chemistry and biological sciences. In the fall of 1989, she joined the faculty at Caltech. In 2009, she began her term as Chair of the Division. Dr. Barton has won many prestigious awards, including the 2010 National Medal of Science from President Obama.

If you are interested in attending, please register here. Midwood Science Research students will receive extra credit if they submit the public lecture assignment to their supervising teacher the day after. An attendance photo will also be taken.

Gene Therapy: A Forever Fix

Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2014 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.


This event has no public webpage.
Click the image above to read the
dust jacket for Dr. Lewis’s latest book.

Ricki Lewis is a science writer with a PhD in genetics. She is author of the true story The Forever Fix: Gene Therapy and the Boy Who Saved It, the college textbook Human Genetics: Concepts and Applications, co-author of two human anatomy and physiology textbooks, and has also published a short genetics book, an essay collection, a novel about stem cells, and more than 3,000 articles. She also writes the Public Library of Science (PLoS), Medscape Medical News, Scientific American, the Multiple Sclerosis Discovery Forum, the Genetics Society of America and the Rett Syndrome Research Foundation. She is a genetic counselor at CareNet Medical Group in Schenectady, NY, and teaches Genethics online for the PhD program at the Alden March Bioethics Institute of Albany Medical College. Dr. Lewis is a frequent public speaker and lives near Schenectady, New York.

Gene Therapy: A Forever Fix
Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 11:30 AM – 2:00 PM
43rd Annual Nelson Rosenthal Convocation
New York University — Eisner and Lubin Auditorium
60 Washington Square South, New York NY 10002

Contact Ms. Ross if you would like to go. Attend, listen, and take notes. Retain your admission ticket, program, or any other handout given at the lecture. Have your photo taken at the event by a teacher or other approved attendance taker. Complete this assignment while the lecture is still fresh in your mind. Bring the completed, typed assignment to your supervising teacher with proof of attendance to your next meeting. Be prepared to answer additional questions.

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