The Home of Midwood Science Research

NYU Poly to hold STEMagination event in April

Posted on Wednesday, April 15, 2015 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Sophomores.

Polytechnic School of Engineering will be hosting a series of workshops for high school students as part of an all day event called STEMagination on Sunday, April 19, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM. Each workshop consists of different activities ranging from challenges to competitions. Activities will be fun and engaging, but you don’t need to be a rocket scientist to succeed. By the end of the day, the basic principles of engineering and science will be revealed to you — principles you might not know you already now. You will also be able to speak to admissions office personnel about NYU Poly or college in general.

STEMagination is organized by the NYU Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers (SASE) in partnership with the White House Initiative for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI). This event is open to high school students of all ethnicities. Interested students should register using this Eventbrite web page. Space is limited. Students that provide evidence of participation will receive extra credit.

Health Professions Recruitment and Exposure Program

Posted on Monday, October 27, 2014 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Sophomores.


HPREP 2015 Application Packet

Must be postmarked no later than
Wednesday, November 5, 2014.

The Health Professions Recruitment and Exposure Program (HPREP) is an enrichment program for 10th and 11th graders at the Weill Cornell Medical College on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. It is a national program addressing the issues of declining enrollment rates of underrepresented minorities, specifically in medicine and generally in the health professions. HPREP exposes high school sophomores and juniors to science-related activities and teaches students about the steps needed to become a physician or other health care provider.

The program consists of ten (10) two and a half hour sessions held on Friday afternoons during the months of January, February, and March. Students will attend lectures given by physicians at The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Cornell Medical College. They will also participate in small group workshops led by Weill Cornell medical students. All participants will be required to submit a research paper on an approved topic of interest in medicine at the conclusion of the program. At the end of the program, two participants will receive a College Book Scholarship, to be used during their first year of college enrollment.

2014 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Monday, October 27, 2014 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Lectures, Seniors, Sophomores.

On Thursday, November 6, 2014, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its ninth annual Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture for high school and college students. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place from 5:30–7:30 PM on the first floor of Memorial Sloan Kettering's Rockefeller Research Laboratories building (430 East 67th Street, between York and First Avenues).

Registration is easy, but finding a seat with a good view isn't. This event has gotten so popular that the folks at MSKCC needed to set up satellite viewing stations in adjacent conference rooms. Get there a bit early if possible. Light refreshments have traditionally been served before the lectures begin (pizza, chips, fruit, soda, coffee). Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. (Consult the Extra Credit webpage for more info.) Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Place your completed (typed) assignment in my mailbox in the Research Room at any time during the school day on Friday, November 7.

     
Craig B. Thompson   Moderator

Memorial Sloan Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.
     
Daniel A. Heller, PhD   Tiny Solutions to Big Problems: The Impact of Nanotechnologies on Cancer Research

Chemist Daniel Heller focuses on biomaterials and nanoscale engineering for molecular sensors and targeted therapeutics.
     
Danwei Huangfu, PhD   Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: A New Model for Studying Disease — Including Cancer

Developmental biologist Danwei Huangfu investigates the fundamental mechanisms that govern cell identity and how they could be exploited therapeutically to manipulate cell fates in regenerative medicine.
     
David B. Solit, MD   A Study of Extraordinary Responders: Lessons Learned

Physician-scientist David Solit studies human oncology and pathogenesis, genomics, oncogenes and tumor suppressors, cancer therapeutics, and clinical trials.
     

Maker Faire needs volunteers

Posted on Wednesday, September 10, 2014 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Seniors, Sophomores.

Maker Faire has been described as carnival sideshow meets science fair, with robots, engineers, rockets, computer geekery and body paint. Imagine, you can get all that for FREE by volunteering. Just four hours gets you a day pass, eight hours gets you in for the weekend. Learn to solder, pick locks, and screen print on fabric. See the Life-Sized Mousetrap, Coke Zero and Mentos show, and 3D printer village. Dodge Cupcake Cars. Buy a Utility Kilt.

Started in San Mateo, California in 2006, Maker Faire is the premier event for grassroots American innovation. As the World’s Largest DIY festival, this two-day family friendly Faire has something for everyone — a showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness and a celebration of the Maker mindset. This year’s Maker Faire will be held at the New York Hall of Science in Flushing, Queens Saturday and Sunday, September 20 and 21, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

You can learn about all your volunteering options here. (Volunteers are called "Travelers" at Maker Faire.) Midwood Science students who volunteer will, of course, receive extra credit. Contact Mr. Elert if you have any questions about Maker Faire in the Research class.

 

The World Science Festival needs you

Posted on Thursday, May 1, 2014 by for Everyone, Extra Credit.

Physics Photo Contest

Posted on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 by for Extra Credit.

For many years the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) High School Physics Photo Contest has provided teachers and students an opportunity to learn about the physics behind natural and contrived situations by creating visual and written illustrations of various physical concepts. Students compete in an international arena with more than 1,000 of their peers for recognition and prizes. The contest is open to high school students in grades 9–12. Entries are welcome every year between March 1 and May 15 for that year’s competition. Photos may be entered in one of two categories described below, and will be judged on the quality of the photo and the accuracy of the physics in the explanation that accompanies the photograph.

  • Natural photos are those that involve everyday situations that may demonstrate a variety of physics concepts.
  • Contrived photos are those that are set up to show a particular physics concept or related set of concepts.

If you have a photo you would like to submit to this contest, please email it to me as soon as possible. I will give you advice on what to write for copy. The deadline for this competition is May 15, but if you give me your photo for the first time on this day you will not be allowed to enter. Please read the Student Rules before contacting me. You may already have a photo in your archives that could be used for this competition. Look to the past winning entries for inspiration.

           
           
           
           

2014 Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Public Lecture

Posted on Sunday, March 30, 2014 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

The Brooklyn Subsection of the American Chemical Society and the NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering present a free lecture to the public.

Professor Jacqueline K. Barton
Signaling through DNA
Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Lecture

Thursday, April 3, 2014
5:30–7:00 PM

Pfizer Auditorium
NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering
5 Metrotech Center
Brooklyn, NY 11201

We think of the DNA double helix as the library of the cell, encoding all that we are. But DNA can also serve as a conduit for the flow of electrons, a medium for signaling. Like a stack of copper pennies, the stack of DNA base pairs is conductive. Recent experiments have shown that DNA can serve as a conduit for the transport of electrons over long molecular distances. We can use this to chemistry design sensitive DNA-based diagnostic sensors. Nature uses this chemistry to find where DNA is damaged and in need of repair — an important mechanism in maintaining our genetic library against the damage associated with aging, cancer, and oxidative stress.

Dr. Jacqueline K. Barton is the Arthur and Marian Hanisch Memorial Professor of Chemistry and Chair of the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. She is a native New Yorker. Barton was awarded the A.B. summa cum laude at Barnard College in 1974 and a Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry at Columbia University in 1978 in the laboratory of Stephen J. Lippard. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Bell Laboratories and Yale University with Robert G. Shulman, she became an assistant professor at Hunter College. In 1983, she returned to Columbia University, becoming an professor of chemistry and biological sciences. In the fall of 1989, she joined the faculty at Caltech. In 2009, she began her term as Chair of the Division. Dr. Barton has won many prestigious awards, including the 2010 National Medal of Science from President Obama.

If you are interested in attending, please register here. Midwood Science Research students will receive extra credit if they submit the public lecture assignment to their supervising teacher the day after. An attendance photo will also be taken.

The PhysicsBowl Approaches

Posted on Saturday, March 29, 2014 by for Extra Credit.

The PhysicsBowl is a competition for high school students and schools. Each year, approximately 10,000 students take a 40 question, 45 minute timed, multiple choice test under their school’s supervision. Students compete in Division I (first-year physics students) or Division II (second-year physics students). Students and schools compete against each other by geographical region. (Specialized math and science schools are treated as a separate region.) Awards are given to the top students and schools in a division and region.

The questions for the PhysicsBowl are taken from high school physics classes at all levels (conceptual physics, AP Physics B/C, modern physics, etc.). It is NOT expected that any one student or school will have covered all the topics on the test. Practice exams can be printed out or taken online.

The 2014 PhysicsBowl will be administered at Midwood period 9–10, Wednesday, April 9 in room A320. Mr. Spergel is coordinating this event. Registration instructions will be emailed to all research students. Space is limited. Interested students should register and take the practice tests as soon as possible.

Gene Therapy: A Forever Fix

Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2014 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.


This event has no public webpage.
Click the image above to read the
dust jacket for Dr. Lewis’s latest book.

Ricki Lewis is a science writer with a PhD in genetics. She is author of the true story The Forever Fix: Gene Therapy and the Boy Who Saved It, the college textbook Human Genetics: Concepts and Applications, co-author of two human anatomy and physiology textbooks, and has also published a short genetics book, an essay collection, a novel about stem cells, and more than 3,000 articles. She also writes the Public Library of Science (PLoS), Medscape Medical News, Scientific American, the Multiple Sclerosis Discovery Forum, the Genetics Society of America and the Rett Syndrome Research Foundation. She is a genetic counselor at CareNet Medical Group in Schenectady, NY, and teaches Genethics online for the PhD program at the Alden March Bioethics Institute of Albany Medical College. Dr. Lewis is a frequent public speaker and lives near Schenectady, New York.

Gene Therapy: A Forever Fix
Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 11:30 AM – 2:00 PM
43rd Annual Nelson Rosenthal Convocation
New York University — Eisner and Lubin Auditorium
60 Washington Square South, New York NY 10002

Contact Ms. Ross if you would like to go. Attend, listen, and take notes. Retain your admission ticket, program, or any other handout given at the lecture. Have your photo taken at the event by a teacher or other approved attendance taker. Complete this assignment while the lecture is still fresh in your mind. Bring the completed, typed assignment to your supervising teacher with proof of attendance to your next meeting. Be prepared to answer additional questions.

The Rockefeller University “Christmas Lecture” for 2013

Posted on Saturday, December 7, 2013 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Lectures, Seniors.

The Rockefeller University invites you to participate in Epigenetics: Inheriting More Than Genes. An event for high school students featuring award-winning molecular biologist C. David Allis, Ph.D. Spend a day on campus to learn about the science of epigenetics and how groundbreaking discoveries are revolutionizing our understanding of heredity, evolution, and medicine.

Monday, December 30, 2013
10:30 AM – 2:30 PM
 
The Rockefeller University
Caspary Auditorium
1230 York Avenue at East 66th Street
New York NY 10065

Visit www.rockefeller.edu/talkingscience to view a full schedule for the day, more information about Dr. Allis, criteria for selecting students, and an online registration form. The Talking Science event is intended for high school students and teachers only. Please note: all attendees must be registered online by their school by Friday, December 20, 2013.

Contact Mr. Elert before the deadline if you would like to go.

2013 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Thursday, October 31, 2013 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Seniors.

Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research, features a group of leading scientists from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center presenting their work to high school students and science teachers, offering a chance for them to interact and ask questions about the latest advances in biomedical research. Midwood has always supported this event with a large number of research students.

The seminar will be held at the Rockefeller Research Laboratories, 430 East 67th Street (between First and York Avenues) on Wednesday, November 6, 2013, from 5:30 to 7:30 PM. One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Place your completed (typed) assignment in my mailbox in the Research Room at any time during the school day on Thursday, November 7.

Registration is easy, but finding a seat with a good view isn’t. This event has gotten so popular that the folks at MSKCC needed to set up satellite viewing stations in adjacent conference rooms. Get there a bit early if possible. Light refreshments have traditionally been served before the lectures begin (pizza, chips, fruit, soda, coffee). Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

Moderator
Craig B. Thompson
Memorial Sloan-Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.
Speakers
Omar I. Abdel-Wahab
The Cancer Epigenome: Biology’s New Frontier.
Physician-scientist Omar Abdel-Wahab studies the functional genomics of hematopoietic malignancies.
Emily A. Foley
Travels on the Bi-Orient Express: Cell Division in Normal Cells and in Cancer.
Cell biologist Emily A. Foley investigates the molecular mechanisms of mitosis.
Richard M. White
Making Cancer Transparent: Studying Cancer in Fish from Beginning to End.
Cancer biologist Richard M. White investigates the evolution of metastases in zebrafish.

Design a Brain Experiment Competition

Posted on Friday, October 4, 2013 by for Extra Credit, Miscellaneous.

Updated Thursday, October 17, 2013.

The Dana Foundation invites you to participate in its third annual Design a Brain Experiment Competition. The challenge is to design an original human brain-related experiment that will test creative theories on daily brain activity, brain diseases, brain functions and malfunctions. Experiments will be judged on creativity and originality as well as adherence to the scientific method.

This is to be a research proposal — not a completed (or even started) experiment. Entries must be submitted by a supervising teacher. A supervising teacher may not submit more than 5 proposals. Students can enter as individuals or as a group. The competition guidelines use the word “classroom” a few times, but a group entry does not need to be made by a whole class. Proposals must not exceed 4 pages in length (plus 1 page for references or 5 total pages). Supervising teachers must submit entries to competition@dana.org no later than Friday, January 17, 2014. Winners will be announced during Brain Awareness Week March 10–16, 2014.

The Dana Foundation is devoted to promoting an interest in the brain and research in schools across the country. They also sponsor the New York City Regional Brain Bee in February. The Brain Bee is like a spelling bee but instead of spelling words, students are challenged to answer questions about the brain. More info on that competition later.

Maker Faire needs volunteers

Posted on Wednesday, September 11, 2013 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Seniors.

Started in San Mateo, California in 2006 (followed by Detroit, New York, Rome, and Tokyo), Maker Faire is the premier event for grassroots innovation. As the World’s Largest DIY Festival, this two-day family friendly Faire has something for everyone — a showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness and a celebration of the Maker mindset. This year’s Maker Faire will be held at the New York Hall of Science in Flushing, Queens on Saturday and Sunday, September 21 and 22, 2013 from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

Maker Faire NYC has been described as carnival sideshow meets science fair, with robots, engineers, rockets, computer geekery and body paint. Imagine, you can get all that for FREE by volunteering. Just four hours gets you a day pass, eight hours gets you in for the weekend. Highlights this year include the Life-Sized Mousetrap, Coke Zero and Mentos show, 3D printer village, and Hack-a-Puppet. Learn to solder, weld, pick locks, knit, and program an Arduino or Raspberry Pi.

World Science Festival needs volunteers

Posted on Tuesday, April 30, 2013 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Seniors, Sophomores.

World Science Festival

The World Science Festival will be held from Wednesday, May 29th to Sunday, June 2nd at various times and locations across New York City. The festival organizers are looking for high school students who have a passion for science and are willing to contribute time, talent, and enthusiasm.

A list of qualifications and assignments is available at this web page. Register at this web page. Tell them when you are available and how you think you can help. A brief interview and/or training session will be required of all potential volunteers. Extra credit will be awarded, of course, and transit will be covered.

Physics Bowl 2013

Posted on Monday, April 8, 2013 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Seniors.

Hello Research Seniors and Juniors,

We will be holding the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) Physics Bowl Period 9, Tuesday, April 16, 2013 in Room A320.

Participants in this competition take a 45 minute, 40 question multiple choice test written by the AAPT. This event is open to all students who are currently enrolled in an AP Physics class. Students in AP Physics B compete in the first year division, while students in AP Physics C compete in the second year division. (There is a slight difference in questions between the two divisions.) Awards are given to the top students and the top schools in a geographic region. All research students who participate will receive one half point of extra credit.

If you are interested in this event, see Mr. Spergel in room A300 (or email hss28@cornell.edu). He will give you information on how to register and how to take the practice exam online.

DNA Day Essay Contest

Posted on Tuesday, February 5, 2013 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Seniors, Sophomores.

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) invites you to participate in the 8th Annual DNA Day Essay Contest. This year there is one question, which deals with discoveries in genetics that have occurred in the 60 years since Watson and Crick published their model of the DNA double helix.

2013 marks the 60th anniversary of the discovery of the double helix of DNA by James Watson and Francis Crick and the 10th anniversary of the first sequencing of the human genome. Choose either of these breakthroughs and explain its broader impact on biotechnology, human health and disease, or our understanding of basic genetics, such as genetic variation or gene expression.

Justify your answer in detail and be sure to include one or more specific examples of broader impact. Use reliable references and citations to support your argument, for example, research published by experts in scientific journal articles and books.

Interested students should contact Ms. Ross. (Obviously, current and former AP Biology students are strongly encouraged to apply.) Deadline for submission is Friday, March 15, 2013 at 5:00 PM EST. Extra credit will be awarded to any Science Research student (senior, junior, or sophomore) who writes an acceptable essay as judged by Ms. Ross and submits it through the ASHG website before the deadline.

Holiday Lecture: Bacteria’s Deadly Design

Posted on Wednesday, December 12, 2012 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Seniors.

NO MORE SPACE: The 10 slots were filled by 6:00 PM, Wednesday, December 12

The Rockefeller University will be hosting its 2012 Holiday Lecture on Science for High School Students on Thursday, December 27 from 10:30 AM to 2:30 PM. The Rockefeller Holiday Lecture was established in 1959 and modeled on the popular series of science lectures started by Michael Faraday in 1826. This year’s lecture entitled "Bacteria’s Deadly Design: How Earth’s most prevalent life-form uses a microscopic syringe to invade and attack" will be presented by Dr. C. Erec Stebbins, Associate Professor and head of the Laboratory of Structural Microbiology.

Let me know immediately if you wish to attend. I need to submit a list of names by Thursday, December 13 or they will not hold a space for us. This is a long event with a lunch break in the middle. The Rockefeller University is located on York Avenue and East 66th Street in Manhattan near the Hunter College subway station. You will have to provide your own transportation since DoE MetroCards are not valid during Winter Break. (I will reimburse you with a single use MetroCard that can be used for transportation during regular school hours.) Extra credit will be awarded for students who attend and complete the public lecture assignment.

NO MORE SPACE: The 10 slots were filled by 6:00 PM, Wednesday, December 12

2012 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Wednesday, October 24, 2012 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Seniors.

Flyer

Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research, features a group of leading scientists from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center presenting their work to high school students and science teachers, offering a chance for them to interact and ask questions about the latest advances in biomedical research. Midwood has always supported this event with a large number of research students.

The seminar will be held at the Rockefeller Research Laboratories, 430 East 67th Street (between First and York Avenues) on Wednesday, November 7, 2012, from 6:00 to 7:30 PM. One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Place your completed (typed) assignment in my mailbox in the Research Room at any time during the school day on Thursday, November 8.

Registration is easy, but finding a seat with a good view isn’t. This event has gotten so popular that the folks at MSKCC needed to set up satellite viewing stations in adjacent conference rooms. Get there a bit early if possible. Light refreshments have traditionally been served before the lectures begin (pizza, chips, fruit, soda, coffee). Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

2012 Brooklyn Frontiers in Science Public Lecture

Posted on Thursday, October 11, 2012 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

In honor of National Chemistry Week, the Brooklyn Subsection of the New York Local Section of the American Chemical Society will be hosting a free public lecture. The 2012 Brooklyn Frontiers in Public Science Lecture will be presented by a pioneer in nanotechnology and materials science — Prof. George M. Whitesides of Harvard University. This lecture will be held in the Pfizer Auditorium in the Bern Dibner Library at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University in Brooklyn on Thursday, October 25, 2012 from 5:30 to 7:00 PM.

   

Midwood has always showed our support for this lecture series by sending a large number of students. Please register at the NYACS website if you are interested in attending. Get there a bit early if possible. Light refreshments have traditionally been served beforehand. Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one. One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment. Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Place your completed (typed) assignment in my mailbox in the Research Room at any time during the school day on Friday, October 26.

Senior Resume Readers Needed (Extra Credit)

Posted on Saturday, September 22, 2012 by for Extra Credit, Seniors.

I need up to 17 seniors to critique junior resumes. Anyone wishing to participate should contact me as soon as possible. This activity will take place period 9, on 4 different days. You must attend all 4 days to receive credit.

  • Monday, October 1
  • Tuesday, October 2
  • Wednesday, October 3
  • Thursday, October 4

On each day, participating seniors will be assigned to 3 or 4 juniors. The seniors will read and critique the juniors’ resumes in a manner similar to what I did last year. Provide helpful information, so that our juniors have the nicest looking resumes with the best content possible.

☜ Newer Posts      |      Older Posts ☞
Midwood Science banner
Midwood Science Research Program
Glenn Elert — Coordinator

Midwood High School logoMidwood High School at Brooklyn College
Michael McDonnell — Principal
2839 Bedford Avenue
Brooklyn NY 11210
(718) 724–8500
teachers office em ail extension
Mr. Elert (Coordinator) A214 elert@ midwoodscience.org 2141
Ms. Goldstein A317 goldstein@ midwoodscience.org 3172
Ms. Mosley A200 mosley.chem@ gmail.com 2001
administrators office em ail extension
Mr. McDonnell (Principal) 127 mmcdonn2@ schools.nyc.gov 1270
Mr. Rosenfeld (Assistant Principal) A200 trosenf@ schools.nyc.gov 2003