The Home of Midwood Science Research

Sophomores display projects at Science Fair

Posted on Tuesday, June 6, 2017 by for Media, Science Fair.

The stage was set for the sophomore researchers as they present their projects for all of the research students to see.

Sophomore researchers were brought to the present on May 24 for the annual science fair. Coordinated by Mr. Glenn Elert, the presenters each had a project that research teachers Ms. Shaniece Mosley and Ms. Stacy Goldstein.

They have been conducting experiments, collecting and analyzing data, and practicing their speaking skills in preparation for the fair.

"The science fair is always exciting for both the presenters and the judges," said Mr. Elert. "Each year, we always have our special judges which consist of alumni who come back to judge again and be a part of the science fair."

Before the event, Mr. Elert held a short speech guiding all the judges. With 110 judges in all, they consisted of junior, senior, and alumni researchers.

"For me last year, getting judged by upperclassmen was a bit nerve-wracking," said Saba Iqbal '18. "This year, I want to be sure I make the students as comfortable as possible when presenting to me."

To score the presenters, the judges each watch three sophomores present their project. Then, on a paper with categories including the poster board, methods, introduction of the project, and total analysis, the judges give the presenters scores on a scale of 1–10. Then, they add up the individual category scores. The winners of the projects include first place, second place, third place, and honorary mentions.

Vladimir Svidruk '19 presented his project on cockroaches and their tolerance to certain environments.

"I bought my cockroaches from a petshop and then tested them with certain materials." said Svidruk. "Ms. Goldstein heavily prepared us for the event, she provided us with the necessary materials that were needed for some projects, including mine."

After doing many presentations during research classes, Kenny Pierre Louis '19 shared Svidruk's thoughts.

"After doing many presentations with [Mr. K and Ms. Mosley] it really positively affected how I presented in front of the judges."

Participants with posterboards and judges with clipboards

In preparing for the science fair, some of the presenters gained more than just a new science idea.

"In doing this project, I learned a lot about presentation and being able to speak to an audience effectively." said Pierre Louis It took a lot of time making, ordering, and setting up, time management was something I really got from doing the science fair."

Svidruk also admitted that it not only allowed him to gain experience in presenting, but it showed him more into the science field.

"I wouldn't consider myself as a very science type of person, but after doing this it was kind of interesting finding out about spikes and neurons and how they all relate to us humans as well," said Svidruk.

The judges and presenters were all given food afterwards, coordinated by Mr. Tovia Rosenfeld, which consisted of sandwiches, salads, desserts, and drinks. During this time, the judges and presenters gathered with their friends and some seniors spoke about how they may not be able to see all this next year.

"The science fair has always been something that was so much fun to do," said Hufsa Tasnim '17. "It gets me really upset that I may not be able to see all this next year, I will try my best to become a guest judge."

Midwood has been holding the event since the school opened in the 1940s.

Vincent Wang '18 said, "It feels weird being on the other end now, judging these sophomores makes myself proud on how far I've achieved within the research program and that I haven't gave up that drive I had as a sophomore last year."

Juniors had been assigned three to four projects to judge and graded them on a system of 60 points for idividual projects and 70 points for team projects.

Nimrah Naseer '19 said, "This [project] was really stressful for me, I like the writing aspect of science research but the actual hands on activities aren't my favorite part."

The science fair started after tenth period, judging started as the sophomores finalized their boards. After most juniors were done judging the projects and grading them on a rubric, the fair ended off with food being served for all.

Written by Sumaya Ahmed & Ashley Masih (Class of 2018).
This article originally appeared in the June 2017 edition of Argus.

2017 Midwood Science Fair Results

Posted on Friday, June 2, 2017 by for Awards, Science Fair.

And the winners are…

1st Place

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Zoe Robertson
Buffers for Acid Rain
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Ahmad Choudhry & Daniel Gaft
Squirm of the Worm

2nd Place

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Ifra Khan
Birth Order and Personality
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Humayara Karim & Zuha Ahmed
The Search for Bacteria
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Zara Nadeem
The Vitamin C Concentration In Homemade Orange Juice vs. Brand Name

3rd Place

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Maqadus Sakhi & Fizza Nayab
What the fizz
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Emily Movsumova
Testing the Efficiency of Acids on the Rate of Milk Curdling by Using Spectrophotometry Analysis

Honorable Mention

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Tiffany Huynh & Fiona Lin
Do Seeds Need H2O2?
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Sonel Rubinstein
A Taste of Bacteria
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Allen Borshch & Andrew Kobrin
Electrolyte Concentration of Liquids
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Nimrah Naseer
Rust Busters
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Ashley Chen & Amy Chen
The effect of different colored solutions on the absorption of light
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Jie Tang
Kill the Plastic Bottles!
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Yvette Somersel & Michelle Koshelyuk
Calculating Vitamin C Using Titration
 

Midwood alumna’s article on 2017 Science Fair featured on BKLYNER website

Posted on Thursday, June 1, 2017 by for Media, Science Fair.

Midwood Science alumna Zainab Iqbal (class of 2015) reported on this year’s science fair for the local news website BKLYNER. Her article, 10th Annual Midwood HS Science Fair – A Glimpse, offered slice-of-life descriptions of the fair, facts about the science research program at Midwood, and a quick spotlight on senior Mahmoud Abouelkheir and his recent trip to the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in Los Angeles. Follow these links to read more of Zainab’s contributions to BKLYNER and Excelsior (Brooklyn College’s student run news publication).

Winners of the 2017 Midwood Science Fair will be announced sometime after 3:30 PM on Friday, June 2, 2017.

Science fair competitor standing in front of her posterboard Posterboard entitled 'Where do lizards go to lunch?' Judges and contestants in one of the judging rooms
BKLYNER logo Excelsior logo

2017 Science Fair Abstract Book

Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2017 by for Science Fair.

2010 abstract book 2017 abstract book
2011 abstract book
2012 abstract book
2013 abstract book 2014 abstract book 2015 abstract book 2016 abstract book

One week to the Midwood Science Fair

Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 by for Science Fair.

Add to calendar
Wednesday
24

The Midwood Science Fair is almost upon us. Wednesday, May 24, 2017 will be here before you know it. Juniors and seniors meet in the Library period 9. Alumni and other registered celebrity judges show up around 2:45–3:30 (a little early is better than a little late). Sophomores be in your assigned spot by the start of period 11 (your board will be waiting for you). Everyone be prepared for an afternoon of science and celebration.

One month to the Midwood Science Fair

Posted on Monday, April 24, 2017 by for Science Fair.

Add to calendar
Wednesday
24

The 2017 Midwood Science Fair is only a month away. Right now as you read this the sophomore research students are diligently working on their projects, formulating hypotheses, and plotting the best way to gather and analyze data. The juniors and seniors are sharpening their metaphorical pencils as well as their literal questioning skills. The alumni judges are looking forward to seeing old friends at Midwood once again. The teachers are keeping their students focused. Everyone is coordinating their schedules to make sure they’re ready for Wednesday, May 24, 2017.

Two months to the Midwood Science Fair

Posted on Friday, March 24, 2017 by for Science Fair.

Add to calendar
Wednesday
24

The 2017 Midwood Science Fair is scheduled for Wednesday, May 24, 2017. Registration for judges and contestants will be set up in about a month. Add this event to your calendar and prepare your mind for an afternoon of science.

2016 Midwood Science Fair Results

Posted on Friday, June 10, 2016 by for Awards, Science Fair.

And the winners are…

1st Place

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Calvin Huynh
Effect of Calcium on Hatch Rates of Brine Shrimp
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Alice Mo & Md Hoque
The Buzz about Honey: Testing the reliability of honey labels from DNA

2nd Place

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Katie Nikishina
The Truth Behind the Vitamin C Concentration in Homemade and Brand Name Juices
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Shawal Malik
Vitamin C Concentration in Orange Juices
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Noran Abo-Donia & Saba Iqbal
Is your cereal genetically modified?

3rd Place

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Christina Ng
The Fizzy Chemistry of Bath Bombs
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Jessie Zheng & Jennifer Duong
The Buzz about Honey: Determining the Botanical Origins of Honey Using DNA Barcode

Honorable Mention

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Savlatjon Rahmatulloev
Aloe Vera Preservation
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Amy Leong
The Effect of Magnetic Fields on Water Flow
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Renata Sakaeva
Testing the Effectiveness of Natural Antifungal Agents vs. Drugstore Antifungal Agents
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Benjamin Nguyen
The Effect of Temperature and Direct vs. Refracted Light on a Solar Cell’s Ability to Absorb Voltage
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Hebah Jihad
What’s in a Face? Are Composite Faces More Attractive than Real Faces?
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Hafsa Fatima & Naila Mirza
The Verification of a Non-Genetically Modified Protein Bar
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Elizabeth Joseph & Sarah Elmosbah
To Be or Tu-Nah To Be
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Lisa Lu & Beien Lin
Phantom Sensations

Sophomore Researchers Take Spotlight

Posted on Thursday, June 9, 2016 by for Media, Science Fair.

From projects on honey and bees to acid rain and corrosion, the science fair covered a wide range of topics and food. Mr. Glenn Elert coordinates the science fair each year, along with help from Ms. Stacy Goldstein and Ms. Shaniece Mosley.

According to Mr. Elert, he has been coordinating the science fair for about eight years, but Midwood itself has been holding the science fair ever since the school opened.

"The fair is a really exciting event," said Mr. Elert. "There’s a lot of energy and it’s a really great thing to experience, especially since some of the alumni come back."

Sophomore research students had to present their projects while the junior and senior research students were the judges. According to Mr. Elert, the judges score the presenters in different categories, then tally up the scores. Afterwards, Ms. Mosley and Ms. Goldstein look at all the scores on a spreadsheet since the presenters are seen by multiple judges, and decide on first, second and third place, along with honorable mentions. Winners will be decided in June after the scores are calculated.

Photo of one of the presentation rooms with presenters and judges
Presenters and judges at work.

Junior judge Mahmoud Abouelkheir ’17, reminisced about when he was a presenter and compared his presenting experience with his judging experience.

"It’s definitely a new experience from being in that presenter position last year to judging this year," said Abouelkheir. "It’s exciting but at the same time I’d prefer not to do it because I don’t like to be critical, especially to these students that worked so hard on their projects."

Abouelkheir said that he prefers presenting over judging because he feels he can better express himself in presenting instead of judging.

Other junior judge Zenab Jamil ’17, shared Abouelkheir’s excitement over judging, but would rather judge than present.

"It feels kind of nostalgic judging these projects because I was in their position last year," said Jamil. "I would definitely much rather judge though. It’s a lot less pressure and a lot less intimidating."

Senior judge Laila Akallal ’16, has already had her experience with presenting and judging, preferring the former.

"It’s really nice to see how the projects differ from year to year and see everyone come together," said Akallal. "Personally I like presenting a little more because I love sharing what I’ve learned and presenting is gonna be something that you’ll have to do later on in life as well."

The judges knew how stressed and worried the presenters were, so they tried to make it as smooth as possible. Abby Beginyazova ’18, is one of the many presenters and praised the judges for making the whole event comfortable for them and as easy as possible.

"Ms. Mosley and the judges really helped to make things easier for us. We had three weeks and I feel like that was a really short time since the first week was all AP tests," said Beginyazova. "Ms. Mosley and the judges gave us leeway because they knew how stressed we all were and how hard we all worked."

Beginyazova also said that she wished she had more time to work on the project so she could’ve done more trials, but she feels confident in her ability and her project.

Presenter Jessica Rakhamim ’18, shared Beginyazova’s appreciation of the judges and how they made the event as smooth as possible and the presenters comfortable.

"My partner and I worked on the project together. She’s a very artistic person and we described the project in a way that showed that music can be applied to science, and I think the judges made it a lot easier to do that," said Rakhamim. "For our project, we had to present our topic and discuss our data and show how it applied to real life. The judges asked questions that were simple and valid enough. Everyone was really nice."

After presenting, students were offered a variety of food, including  sandwiches, snacks and a multitude of sodas to reward them for their hard work. Elizabeth Skapley ’17, was gracious of the fact that the faculty had ordered food for everyone involved in the science fair.

"I think it’s a really nice thing that the school did to help. There were maybe more than a hundred of us and so much food. I’m surprised there were leftovers," said Skapley. "After a long day, it felt good to sit down with my friends and talk about what projects we liked the most. Overall, I’m happy with the results."

Written by Kaelah Blanchette and Yumna Ahmed (Class of 2017).
This article originally appeared in the June 2016 edition of Argus.

2016 Science Fair Abstract Book

Posted on Wednesday, May 25, 2016 by for Science Fair.

2010 abstract book   2016 abstract book   2013 abstract book
2011 abstract book 2014 abstract book
2012 abstract book 2015 abstract book

One month to the Midwood Science Fair

Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2016 by for Science Fair.

Add this event to your
Google/iCal/Outlook Calendar
Thursday
26

The Midwood Science Fair is only a month away. Right now as you read this the sophomore research students are diligently working on their projects, formulating hypotheses, and plotting the best way to gather and analyze data. The juniors and seniors are sharpening their metaphorical pencils as well as their literal questioning skills. The alumni judges are looking forward to seeing old friends at Midwood once again. The teachers are keeping their students focused. Everyone is coordinating their schedules to make sure they’re ready for Thursday, May 26, 2016.

Sophomores present projects in annual Science Fair

Posted on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 by for Media, Science Fair.

Bacterial growth, lactose formation, and electrolytes were just some of the topics explored by sophomores in preparation for the annual Science Fair on May 28.

"The Science Fair is an excellent way for everyone to gather together, talk about projects, and enjoy good food," said Wen Li Wang ’15.

Principal Michael McDonnell said, "This is the first time the sophomores are given the chance to create something original and present it to the school."

The Science Fair is a yearly event in which sophomores taking Research Projects present their experiments that they worked diligently on to judges. The judges included junior and senior Science Research students and alumni. Juniors and seniors were required to judge three projects and the alumni were required to judge two or three. Around 40 alumni participated in the judging this year. The entire process is student run, and teachers only step in as extras if an alumni doesn’t show up.

Unlike other years, this year, according to Ms. Jennifer Sullivan, there were only three research classes compared to last year’s four. There were also a lot more group projects.

"It went smoothly this year since there was a smaller group," said Mr. Glenn Elert, Science Research teacher. He also added that this year, judges had more time to give feedback and were able to give each project more individualized attention.

Last year, each judge was assigned five projects, which caused judges to rush to finish grading all the projects assigned to them, instead of being able to individualize their comments for each project.

Sophomores were judged based on six different components: poster, abstract, materials and methods, analysis and conclusion, and presentation. Individual projects were scored out of 60, while team projects out of 70. Each project was judged by five different randomly assigned judges to ensure a just and equitable judgment.

"It was a fair rubric and well rounded approach," said Stefanie Henry ’14. "There was room to ask questions."

One of the challenges faced by students was the lack of time to prepare for the project. Students had two weeks to perform their experiments and decorate their poster boards.

"If we had more time to do our projects," said Gary Shun ’17, "we could’ve more accurately measured the results and data."

Mark Dela Pena ’17 said, "We wanted to use a real video recorder to record actual times so they could be more accurate, but we didn’t have time." His partner, Marco Rodriguez ’17, added that the video cameras added credibility because "human perception is often flawed."

The lack of sufficient time caused many students to cut corners when finalizing their research.

Choosing a topic was also difficult for some students.

For example, Ilham Ahmed ’17 had to go through several websites before finding a topic that interested her. At the end, she finally decided to work on lactose formation in various milks.

"I chose this topic because I really like the food sciences and this is a serious issue for lactose intolerant people," said Ahmed. "They need to drink milk because of the nutrients, but they can’t have the lactose."

Finally, another challenge the students had to overcome was the limitation of resources to carry on their projects.

According to Asia Le ’16, there were many projects that involved bacteria. However, students who had projects related to bacteria were only allowed to perform the experiments with resources provided in the research room, A214.

Amna Aslam ’17, who conducted her research on acne, said, "I couldn’t get pathogens, the bacteria that causes acne, which I needed for my desired experiment. It was also hard getting statistics and analyzing the data."

Taiseer Uddin ’17 and Pauletta Lazarevskiy ’17 did their experiment on sound levels and faced many difficulties with finding a quiet room in the school to test their sound level meter. They had to talk to many teachers and switch rooms a few times in order to complete their experiment.

Despite the many difficulties and challenges sophomores faced to get ready for the science fair, the result was rewarding. Researchers were given the opportunity to investigate topics based on their hobbies and the problems they face everyday. They also developed projects that they believed would be beneficial to others.

"I like sports and I like to exercise. I know that sports drinks have electrolytes and I wanted to see if they had a higher concentration of electrolytes than orange juice," said Joanna Midura ’17. "I know you’re not supposed to drink orange juice after working out because of all the carbohydrates, but I just wanted to try and see."

Aslam decided to research on the effects of various cleansers on acne production because she felt that acne is a problem that plagues people of all ages.

"I have acne. Adults have acne. Many people have acne," said Aslam. "It’s very common and I wanted to test which products works best. Neutrogena is the most expensive and it’s always advertised as the best. However advertisers never tell us what it’s being compared to."

Ramirez and Pena decided to work on testing the effects of different Sun Protection Factors (SPF)’s on UV beads.

"We started off with this because since it’s almost summer, most people go to the beach," said Pena. "People always say SPF 100 is the best so we did a test to see whether it really was."

Overall, judges were very pleased with the projects and the amount of work that the sophomores put into creating them,

"So far I think they’re great," said Zainab Iqbal ’15. "They’re not that advanced, but that’s for junior year. This year’s projects are giving students enthusiasm for Junior Research."

Henry said, "You can tell students put a lot of dedication and time into these projects. I enjoyed seeing fellow alumni and being in the educational atmosphere again. I’m glad to see the enthusiasm for science is still strong here."

Dao Quan Lin ’13 said, "Creativity was pretty high this year, however, generating an experimental procedure still needs work."

Seniors who are currently in Science Research can be invited to judge in the next Science Fair.

"It was interesting to start here, and after going through so many competitions, come back to judge the sophomores who did the same thing I did two years ago," said Lucy Lin ’15. "It’s kind of like returning to my childhood."

Lin and Wang plan to judge the Science Fair as alumni next year after finishing their freshman year of college.

"The Science Fair is a good experience for students," said Wang. "It prepares them for college and research as a junior and/or senior."

Mr. Elert added, "It helps sophomores practice conducting experiments, analyzing data, and speaking to the public."

The Science Fair drew attention not only from those who are enthusiastic for science, but also from those who wanted to catch a glimpse of the Hornets’ display of hard work.

"It’s a different language," said Ms. Maria Feehan, a Spanish teacher. "I’m so impressed with the work of all the young scientists. They are all so prepared and poised. They can answer the questions articulately and refer back to their data charts."

Ms. Feehan added that she is impressed with all the hard work that the students put into this project and will definitely come back next year.

"I think it was the best Science Fair ever," said Principal McDonnell.

The date for awards ceremony of the Science Fair has not been determined however it will take place as soon as the scores have been calculated and places have been determined. [Editor’s note: The awards were presented Thursday, June 10, 2015.]

Written by Jocelyn Chen and Nahian Chowdhury (Class of 2016).
This article originally appeared in the June 2015 edition of Argus.
Photos courtesy of Prianka Zaman (Class of 2013).

2015 Midwood Science Fair Results

Posted on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 by for Awards, Science Fair.

And the winners are…

1st Place


Mahmoud Abouelkheir
The Effect of Active Ingredients found in toothpaste on oral bacteria growth (Micrococcus)

Arbaz Aziz & Dmitriy Kim
The Strength of Magnetism Under Varying Temperatures

2nd Place


Allan Nosov
Using Weather Instruments and Folklore to Predict Weather

Terence Kong
The Capability of Antibacterial Soap

Angel Zou & Jennifer Phu
What’s in your seaweed? DNA Barcodes of Different Brands of Seaweed Snacks Commonly Found in Supermarkets

3rd Place


Zenab Jamil
The Primacy Effect

Carmen Zheng
The Effect of Gum and Music on Memory

Noor Asif
Henna Mixology

Sabrina Slutsky & Michelle Fogel
The Most Effective Antacid

Brianna Ku & Michelle Li
The Effect of Different Liquids on Dianthus Flower Growth
 

Honorable Mention


Ilham Ahmed
The Effect of a Variety of Milks on the Amount of Lactose Formed

Chunny Chi
The Effectiveness of Mouthwash Against Escherichia coli

Daniel Mirkin
The Effect of Aerated Water on Yeast Metabolism

Amy Huang
Determining how fast the ink travels across the different kinds of paper

Samuel Pun & Anthony Dinh
Denaturing Proteins under Heat

Jeannine Chen & Jimmy Li
What’s in your seaweed? DNA Barcodes of Different Brands of Seaweed Snacks Commonly Found in Supermarkets.

Alia Abdelhameed & Danielle LoPresti
The Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrations on Hair Strength
   

2015 Science Fair Abstract Book

Posted on Monday, May 25, 2015 by for Science Fair.

Join us in the Annex from 3:30–5:30 PM on Thursday, May 28th for the 2015 Midwood Science Fair. Special thanks to Carmine See (class of 2015) who designed the cover for this year’s abstract book.

Abstract Book Cover

         
         

5 weeks to the Midwood Science Fair

Posted on Thursday, April 23, 2015 by for Science Fair.

Add this event to your
Google/iCal/Outlook Calendar
Thursday
28

The Midwood Science Fair is only 5 weeks away. Right now as you read this the sophomore research students are diligently working on their projects, formulating hypotheses, and plotting the best way to gather and analyze data. The juniors and seniors are sharpening their metaphorical pencils as well as their literal questioning skills. The alumni judges are looking forward to seeing old friends at Midwood once again. The teachers are keeping their students focused. Everyone is coordinating their schedules to make sure they’re ready for Thursday, May 28, 2015.

Science Fair impresses onlookers

Posted on Thursday, June 19, 2014 by for Media, Science Fair.

The Annex’s was packed with hesitant judges and classrooms filled with edgy sophomores; This was the scene at the annual science fair on Thursday, May 29.

"The science fair left me speechless, literally," Amber Tucker ’16

Every year the sophomores of Science Research, who after taking a course crammed with experiments and presentations, are finally put to the test by showcasing their results at this highly anticipated event. With just under a month to find a project, test variables, and analyze experimentation, preparation for the science fair never fails in leaving students overwrought.

"It was really stressful getting here, but in the end, it was worth it," said Diane Ling ’16. "We learned valuable experiences in the process."

However, unlike every fair, there were many more alumni this year, giving predecessors a chance to relive their judging experiences.

"Being in research since sophomore year, Midwood Science has done so much for me," said Nicholas Lee, who graduated last year. "It was an honor to be able to come back and judge and also to see so many familiar faces in our research family. There were many great projects that I was impressed with and that goes to show the talent of our students that keeps the Midwood Research program going strong!"

Many senior research students had already judged last year, but the anticipation of this much too rare event never ceases to excite past participants.

"I definitely look forward to the science fair every year," said Kiara Nunez ’14. "It’s nice to see the new wave of students coming into research and presenting the projects. Plus, I always look forward to the food."

After viewing, listening and asking questions, the judges calculate a grade out of 60, or 70 for teams, based on presentation, research, data verification and more. Judging this year was an especially gratifying experience for juniors, who had the pleasure of being on the other side of things this year.

"Being able to judge instead of being the one presenting this year was really fun," said Jessica Yip ’15. "I finally got to see what we were being grading on and how the points were distributed. Seeing the sophomores so nervous reminded me of how I was last year."

The winners of the science fair are determined by their respective grades. Each participant gets a grade from five judges, but the highest grade and lowest grade are dropped in an effort to eliminate any extraneous decisions. The highest average of the three remaining grades takes home the first place, separately for individuals and teams, with each trailing grade winning second place, third place, or even an honorable mention. Despite the high levels of competition in the race for the trophy, the science fair is always a great time to learn interesting facts and meet new people.

"After the judging takes place and nerves have settled, the fair turns into a get-together where students and teachers socialize and just have a good time," said Nunez ’14. "The science fair gives research students from all three grades the opportunity to come together, which rarely happens."

In the eyes of the science faculty, this year’s science fair ran quite professionally.

"This year we had more alumni than ever before, nearly 60 versus the normal 30," said Mr. Glenn Elert. "We also had two professors serve as judges, Dr. Frank Grasso from the Psychology Department of Brooklyn College and Ms. Yara Adam from the Physics Department. The large number of alumni and guests made the judging process exceptionally smooth. It was great fun to see them all again and catch up on their lives after Midwood."

While some aspects of the event never change from year to year and others were quite better this time, everyone can agree that the science fair is a perfect blend of the intuition and creativity of science and school spirit.

"The science fair took patience, work and diligence, but paid off at the end," said Angela Christopher ’16.

Shanna Huang & Hussain Bokhari (Class of 2015)
This article originally appeared in the June 2014 edition of Argus.
Photos courtesy of Prianka Zaman (Class of 2013)
Line drawing by Nicole Ng (Class of 2011)

2014 Midwood Science Fair Results

Posted on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 by for Awards, Science Fair.

1st Place


Jessica Lin & Eileen Chen
Electrolytes in beverages.

Laila Akallal
Is the speed of light truly constant?

Mie Abouelkheir
The effects of microwave radiation on the growth of E. coli.

2nd Place


Gabriela Villagomez
Visual memory vs. Auditory memory.

Vanessa Mai
Gumcentration.

3rd Place


Noshin Hayat
The effect of antacids on the stomach.

Aisha Khoja
Comparing antacid potency.

Joshua Pilipovsky
A change in the winds: Bernoulli’s principle.

Honorable Mention


Bilal Azhar & Wendy Jiang
Effect of acidity and temperature on a fruit’s electric current.

Alexandra Gayle & Kai Saunders
What drinks contain the most electrolytes?

Vivian Ng & Ibraar Aziz
The effect of carbonated drinks on the human body.

Mohammed Chowdhury
Which antacid works the best?

Samera Arif
The effect of acidic citrus fruits and skin tone on henna stain.

Gabrielle Tolchinsky
Hydrogen peroxide’s effect on seed germination.

 

2014 Science Fair Abstract Book

Posted on Thursday, May 29, 2014 by for Science Fair.

Abstract Book Cover

Save the Date

Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2014 by for Science Fair.

Thursday
29

Add this event to your
Google/iCal/Outlook calendar.

2013 Midwood Science Fair Results

Posted on Wednesday, June 5, 2013 by for Awards, Science Fair.

individuals

teams

  1. Hussain Bokhari
    Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: The Future of Renewable Energy
  1. Bernice Pham & Johnny Warn
    Which Dish Detergent Is Most Effective?
  2. Jennifer Chen & Jason Zheng
    Does Shape Affect Parachutes?
  1. Jing Wei Hu
    Photons Action!
  2. Meghan Ng
    The Effect Environment and Medium on Germinating Radish Seeds
  1. Anthony Dacres & Levtrim Kelmendi
    Reaction Times of Different Pain Relievers in Acetic Acid
  2. Amy Chen & Yukie Wong
    Effectiveness of Zinc Oxide on Ultraviolet Radiation
  1. Jessica Yip
    The effectiveness of different types of wipes
  2. Bella Zilber
    Which product stains teeth the most? Coffee, Tea, Water, or Coke?
  3. Ester Shamailova
    The Strength of Glue
  1. Brian Choi & Ashley Tan
    The Effect of Liquid Hand Soap Against Staphylococcus epidermidis
  2. Jacky Cham & Richard Wu
    The Effects of High and Low pH on Radish Growth
  3. Dianna Roman & Valeriya Falkovich
    Which Brand of Toothpaste is Most Effective Against Staphylococcus?
  4. Kelly Tom & Eunice Lee
    Pearly Whites
  1. Olena Hadelia
    Which Vitamin C Has the Most Vitamin C?
  2. Lucy Lin
    Which Affects Your Heart More: Hard Rock or Soft Piano Music?
  3. Aarin Chase
    Acne Medication Effectiveness on Propionibacterium acne
  4. Syeda Hillary
    Are You Safe in School?
  5. Michael Divgun
    Do Frozen Foods or Canned Foods Have Better Nutritional Value?
  6. Emily Sokolson
    Amount of mold growth due to preservatives
  7. Stanley Purygin
    How different spices affect E. coli growth
  8. Sandra Lin
    Which Brand of Aluminum Foil Works Best?
  9. Raymond Lopez
    Bio Isolation of Caffeine from Tea
  10. Aleksey Ladina
     
  1. Dajana Reci & Anna Stafeyeva
    Grow Plants Grow!
  2. Zainab Iqbal & Marisol Morales
    Brain Dominance
  3. Tiffany Sanabia & Dominique Semple
    The Effect of Cocoa Powder on the Growth of Bacteria
  4. Nancy Li & Vivian Tan
    Speed Up!
  5. Hillary Yip & Karry Ho
    The Effect of the Amount of Fertilizer on Plant Growth
  6. Sandy Wu & Candice Zhong
    Chips on Fire!
Older Posts ☞
Midwood Science banner
Midwood Science Research Program
Glenn Elert — Coordinator

Midwood High School logoMidwood High School at Brooklyn College
Michael McDonnell — Principal
2839 Bedford Avenue
Brooklyn NY 11210
(718) 724–8500
teachers office em ail extension
Mr. Elert (Coordinator) A214 elert@ midwoodscience.org 2141
Ms. Goldstein A317 goldstein@ midwoodscience.org 3172
Ms. Mosley A200 mosley.chem@ gmail.com 2001
administrators office em ail extension
Mr. McDonnell (Principal) 127 mmcdonn2@ schools.nyc.gov 1270
Mr. Rosenfeld (Assistant Principal) A200 trosenf@ schools.nyc.gov 2003