The Home of Midwood Science Research

Hornets Come Out on Top at NYCSEF

Posted on Monday, May 1, 2017 by for Media, NYCSEF.

Out of 130 finalists, seven students from Midwood made the NYCSEF finals and showcased their projects at the Museum of Natural History. The finalists are Mahmoud Abouelkheir '17, Allan Nosov '17, Nomon Mohammad '17, Lilin Liu '17, Vivian Luu '17, Minna Zeldin '17, and Amna Aslam '17.

According to midwoodscience.org, NYCSEF, also called the New York City Science and Engineering Fair, is a yearly competition in which hundreds of students participate in a preliminary round at City College and a final round at the Museum of Natural History. Sponsored by the Department of Education and CUNY, NYCSEF allows students to learn about a field they're interested in and get a chance to become a recognized and accomplished person, which also stands out on a college application.

Mentors at Brooklyn College, City College and the Hospital for Special Surgery supervised the finalists. They did projects in different fields, such as biology, physics, and earth and environmental science and presented them to expert judges. The winners can get various awards, internships, scholarships, and cash prizes.

One of the top projects included "Intra-microcolony spatial positioning affects antibiotic susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae," by Mahmoud Abouelkheir. He was awarded the NYCSEF First Award and the Intel ISEF award, which are the highest awards of the competition. Abouelkheir expressed his excitement, as winning an award and competing with others is something he would never forget.

"NYCSEF was a different experience that other science fairs I've been to. I also participated in the first and second round," he said. "I did not think I was going to become a finalist. It was really cool that I had one of the top projects."

Nomon Mohammad received the NYCSEF Second Award and the ASM Materials Education Foundation Award for his engineering project on studying different ways to use electrolytes to optimize energy storage in batteries. Mohammad described his experience at NYCSEF and believed that winning the award was a symbol of the hard work and he and his lab put into the project.

7 students arranged around a large lunar globe
Vivian Luu, Amna Aslam, Nomon Mohammad, Allan Nosov,
Mahmoud Abouelkeir, Minna Zeldin, Lilin Liu

"It was interesting to see other people's projects at the competition because it really represented their scientific exploration and their effort," he said. "I hope that the research program grows in the coming years because it's something that can change one's perspective on science."

Lilin Liu was one of the students to win the NYCSEF Third Award, but also won the Brooklyn Navy Yard Award for her project testing the effectiveness of x-ray fluorescence on lead contaminated vegetables.

"Winning an award is always beneficial. Not only does it make you feel good, but it's good for college too. I also received a paid internship because of this project – it's a good opportunity and can help me achieve more in the future," she said.

Allan Nosov, another student to receive the NYCSEF Second Award, did an earth and environmental science project called "Lapse rate analysis — model versus observations." Nosov felt honored to have competed with the other students and found the event to be enjoyable.

"Competing with the other students was fun because their projects were really exceptional. It was fun because I met new people from other schools and I think it was a good educational opportunity," he said.

The top 16 projects will continue on and represent New York City at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in Los Angeles, California during May 14–19. For more information on the finalists, visit nycsef.cuny.edu.

Written by Yumna Ahmed Qazi (Class of 2017).
Sara Omran (Class of 2019) and Shakila Islam (Class of 2018) also contributed to this article.
This article originally appeared in the April 2017 edition of Argus.

Midwood Science projects strength at the 2nd Teptu

Posted on Friday, April 21, 2017 by for Awards, Miscellaneous.

Teptu is a nonprofit organization of (mostly young) entrepreneurs headquartered in New York City dedicated to providing educational opportunities and fostering awareness in both entrepreneurship and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). On Monday, April 3, 2017 Teptu held their second annual STEM and Entrepreneurship Conference (a.k.a. Teptu Brink) at the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, Queens. Over 100 students from about a dozen NYC schools were present for the finals round — including 22 Midwood students. Amna Aslam and Mahmoud Abouelkheir made it into the top 10. Spirits were kept high during the competition with engaging guest speakers and music from an appropriately loud rock band and a soothingly mellow Japanese-American jazz trio. "Not enough snacks" was the only complaint heard.

  • Amna Aslam
    "Role of nucleolar stress factors in DNA damage response." Amna worked under the supervision of Dr. Anjana D. Saxena in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.
  • Mahmoud Abouelkheir (Microbiology)
    "Intra-microcolony spatial positioning affects antibiotic susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae."
    Mahmoud worked under the supervision of Dr. Nicolas Biais in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.

Amna Aslam presents at AACR 2017 Annual Meeting in Washington, DC

Posted on Monday, April 3, 2017 by for Publications.

Amna Aslam, a Midwood senior, and Iqra Nadeem, a Brooklyn College junior, were poster presenters at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2017 Annual Meeting in Washington, DC this past Sunday, April 2. Their project was entitled, "Higher nucleolar index of nucleolin as an indicator of aberrant cellular DNA damage response (DDR)". Additional authors included Midwood class of 2016's Rumsha Javed and Jingyuan Wang, Anna Kozlova, Danielle Gordon, Ruchama Steinberg, Rachele Dolce Rameau, and Xinyin Jiang of Brooklyn College. Dr. Anjana D. Saxena of Brooklyn College and the CUNY Graduate Center was the supervising scientist.

Amna Aslam standing in front of the poster she contributed to
AACR banner

7 Midwood students receive NYCSEF awards; Mahmoud Abouelkheir receives ISEF award; Lilin Liu awarded Brooklyn Navy Yard internship

Posted on Sunday, April 2, 2017 by for Awards, ISEF, NYCSEF.

NYCSEF is the annual New York City Science and Engineering Fair with hundreds of participants from across the five boroughs. Roughly 400 participants are selected from 700–800 entries to participate in the Preliminary Round held at City College. The top 25% of these go on to the Finals Round at the American Museum of Natural History. These students compete against one another for various awards, internships, scholarships, and cash prizes. The top 16 projects go on to represent NYC at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in Los Angeles, California May 14–19.

NYCSEF logo

Midwood Science is proud to congratulate Mahmoud Abouelkheir for receiving the highest award of the competition — the Intel ISEF Award. Lilin Liu received an award from the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation, which includes a paid internship. Allan Nosov and Nomon Mohammad also received special awards. Vivian Luu, Minna Zeldin, and Amna Aslam rounded out the list of award winners.

This year's Finalists worked in the Departments of Biology, Physics, and Earth and Environmental Sciences at Brooklyn College; the offices of NOAA-CREST at City College; and the Flow Cytometry Core Facility at the Hospital for Special Surgery. Special thanks to all the mentors for their dedication and hard work.

NYCSEF First Award and Intel ISEF Award

ISEF logo
  • Mahmoud Abouelkheir (Microbiology)
    "Intra-microcolony spatial positioning affects antibiotic susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae."
    Mahmoud worked under the supervision of Dr. Nicolas Biais in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.

NYCSEF Second Award

  • Allan Nosov (Earth & Environmental Sciences)
    "Lapse rate analysis — model versus observations."
    Allan worked under the supervision of Dr. Brian Vant-Hull in the office of NOAA-CREST at City College. Allan also won a NASA Earth System Science Award for a project that offers the greatest insight into the Earth's interconnected systems.
  • Nomon Mohammad (Engineering)
    "Anthraquinone as an effective electrolyte for redox flow batteries."
    Nomon worked under the supervision of Mr. Domenec Paterno and Dr. Sophia Suarez in the Department of Physics at Brooklyn College. Nomon also received the ASM Materials Education Foundation Award for outstanding research related to materials science.

NYCSEF Third Award

Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation logo
  • Lilin Liu (Earth & Environmental Sciences)
    "The effectiveness of x‑ray fluorescence on lead contaminated vegetables."
    Lilin worked under the supervision of Dr. Zhongqi (Joshua) Cheng in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Brooklyn College. Lilin also won a Brooklyn Navy Yard Award for an exceptional project that promotes the Navy Yard's commitment to academic excellence and scientific inquiry.
  • Vivian Luu (Chemistry)
    "A variable temperature study of the conductivity and activation energy of aqueous solutions of VOSO4 in 1 M TFSA."
    Vivian worked under the supervision of Mr. Domenec Paterno and Dr. Sophia Suarez in the Department of Physics at Brooklyn College.
  • Minna Zeldin (Medicine & Health Sciences)
    "Circuit amplification with DNA strand displacement cascade for the evolution of cell surfaces."
    Minna worked under the supervision of Dr. Sergei Rudchenko in the Flow Cytometry Core Facility at the Hospital for Special Surgery.
  • Amna Aslam (Microbiology)
    "Role of nucleolar stress factors in DNA damage response."
    Amna worked under the supervision of Dr. Anjana D. Saxena in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.

NYCSEF Showcases Young Scientists

Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2017 by for Media, NYCSEF.

Students across New York City schools, private and public, were able to showcase their creativity and intelligence through their experiments in the yearly New York City Science and Engineering Fair (NYCSWEF) preliminary round, which was under way on Sunday, March 5 in City College.

“This fair ultimately isn’t about winning. It’s that you know what your talking about and a project you worked hard on is heard,” said Angel Zou ’17.

Seven hornets were accepted to participate in the finals. Mahmoud Abouelkheir ’17 and Amna Aslam ’17 in the category microbiology, Lilin Liu ’17 and Allan Nosov ’17 in the category earth and environmental sciences, Vivian Luu ’17 in the category chemistry, Nomon Mohammad ’17 in the category engineering and Minna Zeldin ’17 in the category medicine and health science qualified. The finals will take place on Tuesday, March 28 at the museum of natural history. Then, those finalists will have the opportunity of competing in nationals located in Los Angeles.

“This is an amazing chance to showcase all the hard work students put in and the broad range of topics that science covers,” said Mahmoud Abouelkheir ’17. “everyone can learn something new from this fair.”

Some projects were printed out on large posters, while others were on tri-boards. Each experiment had an introduction (background research), a hypothesis, a data, an analysis of that data, and a conclusion.

This fair had a specific judging system. Each experiment was assigned 3 judges and they asked questions based on the experiment’s methodology. Student scientists weren’t allowed to move away from their project until they were evaluated by the judges.

Mahmoud’s project was titled Intra Microcolony Spatial Positioning Affects Antibiotic Susceptibility In Neisseria Gonorrhoeae. This complex project tested the physical properties of bacteria.

Group photo at the front of Shepard Hall

“The purpose of this kind of fair is to get students involved in taking part in something big,” said Minna Zeldin ’17, “the fair allows students to present information and discoveries that might turn into something much bigger in the future.”

Minna created an experiment that tried to prove that DNA strands can move around from cell to cell in search of a specific marker that is found on cancer cells.

Angel Zou ’17 partnered with Whitney Wong ’17 created an experiment that uses microscopic water dwelling organisms called tardigrade to see how they affect E. coli.

“One can’t become a scientist without acting first. This fair gives students the opportunity to work in labs and become mini scientists,” said Angel Zou ’17.

Many people came to observe the science fair. Md Hoque ’18 and his friends were astonished by all the different, elaborate experiments. Md mainly focused on the biology section because he is currently working on a project where he uses a fungi, a yeast, to clean tap water and get rid of the pharmaceutical drugs found in it. He is trying to find a way to insert human liver enzymes into yeast and have them metabolize the drugs inside New York tap water. The goal of this project is to cleanse the water so marine species don’t die.

Hoque ’18 said, “every single project has their unique future implications, whether it’s creating a safer traveling regime for vaccines or making us age slower or even helping to find a cure cancer. Plus we are most likely going to continue our projects and aid in real world issues.”

This research competition was sponsored by the New York City Department of Education and the City University of New York (CUNY).

NYCSEF isn’t the only fair for the next generation to try to make a difference. Seniors are preparing for the next competition, Teptu STEM Research Conference, which will take place on Monday, April 3.

Written by Jonathan Krimgold and Klyve Morisseau (Class of 2018).
This article originally appeared in the March 2017 edition of Argus.

7 Midwood students advance to NYCSEF finals

Posted on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 by for Awards, NYCSEF.

The New York City Science and Engineering Fair (NYCSEF) is the city’s largest high school research competition. More than 700 students from around the city submitted applications in 2017. The top 130 projects were selected to advance to the Finals Round on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 at the American Museum of Natural History. Midwood High School sent 7 students to this year’s competition under the big blue whale. Awards will be presented on Friday, March 31, 2017 in the Tribeca Performing Arts Center at the Borough of Manhattan Community College 4:00–6:00 PM.

7 students arranged around a large lunar globe
Vivian Luu, Amna Aslam, Nomon Mohammad, Allan Nosov,
Mahmoud Abouelkeir, Minna Zeldin, Lilin Liu

  • Mahmoud Abouelkheir
    "Intra-microcolony spatial positioning affects antibiotic susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae." Mahmoud worked under the supervision of Dr. Nicolas Biais in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.
  • Amna Aslam
    "Role of nucleolar stress factors in DNA damage response." Amna worked under the supervision of Dr. Anjana D. Saxena in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.
  • Vivian Luu
    "A variable temperature study of the conductivity and activation energy of aqueous solutions of VOSO4 in 1 M TFSA." Vivian worked under the supervision of Mr. Domenec Paterno and Dr. Sophia Suarez in the Department of Physics at Brooklyn College.
  • Lilin Liu
    "The effectiveness of x‑ray fluorescence on lead contaminated vegetables." Lilin worked under the supervision of Dr. Zhongqi (Joshua) Cheng in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Brooklyn College.
  • Nomon Mohammad
    "Anthraquinone as an effective electrolyte for redox flow batteries." Nomon worked under the supervision of Mr. Domenec Paterno and Dr. Sophia Suarez in the Department of Physics at Brooklyn College.
  • Allan Nosov
    "Lapse rate analysis — model versus observations." Allan worked under the supervision of Dr. Brian Vant-Hull in the office of NOAA-CREST at City College.
  • Minna Zeldin
    "Circuit amplification with DNA strand displacement cascade for the evolution of cell surfaces." Minna worked under the supervision of Dr. Sergei Rudchenko in the Department of Flow Cytometry at Hospital for Special Surgery.

The big blue whale suspended over the Millstein Hall of Ocean Science
Under the big blue whale

News update from Midwood Science

Posted on Sunday, March 19, 2017 by for Awards, ISEF, JSHS, Media, Ocean Science, Robotics, St. Joseph's, STS.

Here’s what we’ve been up to in 2017 so far (plus one story from 2016 I finally got around to writing). More good news is sure to follow.

Midwood collects top awards at St. Joseph’s College

Posted on Sunday, February 5, 2017 by for St. Joseph’s.

Nomon Mohammad and Hufsa Tasnim are JSHS Semifinalists

Posted on Friday, February 10, 2017 by for JSHS.

Robotics Team Rolls into Victory at FTC

Posted on Sunday, January 22, 2017 by for Robotics.

Ocean Science Team prepares for competiton

Posted on Sunday, January 22, 2017 by for Ocean Science.

Nomon Mohammed receives 2 badges in the 2017 Regeneron STS

Posted on Wednesday, January 11, 2017 by for Awards, STS.

Urooj Ansari and Bilal Azhar appear on News 12 Brooklyn

Posted on Friday, May 6, 2016 by for ISEF, Media.

Nomon Mohammad and Hufsa Tasnim are JSHS Semifinalists

Posted on Friday, February 10, 2017 by for Awards, JSHS.

Husfsa and Nomon standing in front of stairs holding certificates

On Sunday, February 5th, 2017 two Midwood Students — Hufsa Tasnim and Nomon Mohammad — were chosen as semifinalists to present in front of judges and other semifinalists at York College for the New York City Metro Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (JSHS). Both students won second place in their individual categories. Nomon Mohammad was chosen to move forward as one of the top 10 finalists in the city. Once again, our research students have not failed to make Midwood proud!

  • Nomon Mohammad
    "Anthraquinone as an effective electrolyte for redox flow batteries." Nomon worked under the supervision of Dr. Sophia Suarez and Mr. Domenec Paterno in the Department of Physics at Brooklyn College.
  • Hufsa Tasnim
    "Epistatic interaction between sgo‑1 and htp‑2 mutants in chromosome and centrosome inheritance." Hufsa worked under the supervision of Dr. Mara Schvarzstein in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College

Written by Noor Asif and Pauletta Lazarevskiy (Class of 2017).

Midwood collects top awards at St. Joseph’s College

Posted on Sunday, February 5, 2017 by for Awards, St. Joseph's.

On February 4th 2017, the 22nd Annual High School Poster Session was held at St. Joseph’s College in Fort Green, Brooklyn. 22 midwood students presented their research findings at the event to multiple judges. Midwood faced strong competition from many schools including Union City, which had twice as many students as Midwood. Midwood students took away all first and second place awards as well as 4 honorable mentions.

  1. Jennifer Phu and Elizabeth Skapley
    "Synthesis of trifluorinated alkynes as intermediates to catechol synthesis." Jennifer and Elizabeth worked under the supervision of Dr. Wayne F.K. Schnatter in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Long Island University.
  2. Marco Ramirez
    "Alkyl chain length influence on conductivity and activation energy of pyrrolidinium-based RTILs." Marco worked under the supervision of Dr. Sophia Suarez and Mr. Domenec Paterno in the Department of Physics at Brooklyn College.
Jennifer and Elizabeth standing in front of their poster Marco standing in front of his poster
  1. Amna Aslam
    "Role of nucleolar stress factors in DNA damage response." Amna worked under the supervision of Dr. Anjana D. Saxena in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.
  2. Mahmoud Abouelkheir
    "Intra-microcolony spatial positioning affects antibiotic susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae." Mahmoud worked under the supervision of Dr. Nicolas Biais in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.
Amna standing in front of her poster Mahmoud standing in front of his poster
  1. Erica Levin
    "Determining the mercury concentrations in the atmosphere using a biotracker." Erica worked under the supervision of Dr. Anthony Carpi and Dr. Erin Mann in the Department of Sciences at John Jay College.
  2. Vivian Luu
    "A variable temperature study of the conductivity and activation energy of aqueous solutions of VOSO4 in 1 M TFSA." Vivian worked under the supervision of Dr. Sophia Suarez and Mr. Domenec Paterno in the Department of Physics at Brooklyn College.
  3. Jasleen Kaur
    "Evaluating efficient methods for determining bioaccessible lead." Jasleen worked under the supervision of Dr. Zhongqi (Joshua) Cheng and Ms. Sara Perl Egendorf in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Brooklyn College.
  4. Whitney Wong and Yang Fan (Angel) Zou
    "Inducement of LEA proteins from Ramazzottius varieornatus for desiccation tolerant Escherichia coli." Whitney and Angel worked under the supervision of Dr. Ellen Jorgensen and Mr. William Shindel at Genspace NYC.

Group photo of the Midwood winners, standing shoulder to shoulder in a row
All 10 award winners from Midwood High School, left to right: Vivian Luu, Jasleen Kaur, Mahmoud Abouelkheir, Marco Ramirez, Elizabeth Skapley, Jennifer Phu, Whitney Wong, Amna Aslam, Yang Fan Angel Zou, Erica Levin

Written by Noor Asif and Pauletta Lazarevskiy (Class of 2017).

Ocean Science Team prepares for competiton

Posted on Sunday, January 22, 2017 by for Media, Ocean Science.

As February quickly approaches, the Ocean Science team is preparing for their next big competition.

Ocean Science is an academic competition focusing on topics such as biology, chemistry, physics and geology within the school where they meet three times a week. They prepare to compete in regional tournaments as qualifiers for nationals.

"The team is very dedicated and I’m proud to be a part of it," said Celine Lam ’18.

According to the National Ocean Sciences Bowl, there are 25 regional competitions in which the winner from each will advance to the finals, which are typically held in April. This year’s finals will be held in Corvallis, Oregon, and the top three winners will be awarded with a trip to exciting locations.

Lam says that to do well on the team, you need to have perseverance and to maintain your grades.

The team is divided into two groups, A and B team. These teams usually contain a mix of juniors and seniors, with a few sophomores. In the beginning of the school year, members take a pretest, quizzing their prior knowledge. Throughout the school year, the members go through the rigorous curriculum. Then they take their posttest before their qualifying tournament, which decides whether or not they go into A team, B team, or neither.

Last year’s A team performed extraordinarily well and placed ninth place in the national Ocean Science tournament.

"I do feel tensed because you’re expected to get things right, but nobody’s perfect so we’re all working hard," said Jennifer Phu ’17, captain of the A team.

The assistant coach Ms. Kimberly Lau said, "There is now pressure to maintain the title but they work really hard and are doing even more work than last year’s team."

Ms. Lau has been improving the way the team learns the curriculum. Accommodating their regular weekly lessons, the students this year now create targeted questions for each unit in the modules and create presentations per unit. The team then competes with each other after their lessons are completed. Ms. Lau then decides whether or not each student had mastered the subject before moving on.

The head coach for this year will likely remain the assistant principal, Mr. Alan Stack, due to Ms. Lau’s busy schedule.

"I love how everyone is friendly and competitive at the same time," said newcomer Ivy Li ’18, "I love learning weird facts about animals and teaching about a topic in ocean is helping me build confidence in my everyday life."

The team members are very excited for newcomers and want to see how they play in an actual tournament.

"It’s competitive but in the end, we’re all still a family," said captain of the B team, Saleh Salem ’18, "It’s rigorous but as long as you keep up, it’s worth it."

Usually Ms. Lau approaches potential team members, which most of the time are her outgoing students since she knows them well. However, for students who are eager to join can directly approach Ms. Lau on her off hours.

Written by Ashley Masih and Kareem Ibrahim (Class of 2018).
This article originally appeared in the January 2017 edition of Argus.

Robotics Team Rolls into Victory at FTC

Posted on Sunday, January 22, 2017 by for Media, Robotics.

The Rolling Drones, Bötley Crüe, and Pink Droyd of the robotics team will be competing on January 14 for the First Tech Challenge.

"This is preparation for the real tech world," said Rabia Javaid ’17, Bötley Crüe’s engineering notebook keeper.

The teams have been preparing for the qualifiers for months. This year’s competition is Velocity Vortex sponsored by Qualcomm. FTC is a big competition that role plays for real life situations. Collecting balls and bringing them to an higher place is this year’s main theme for scoring high but risky points.

"In other words, future innovator’s robots could go up in space and collect particles," said Javaid ’17.

Programs like FTC spurs up competitive spirits and push out 21 century work-life skills like problem solving, management, and communication to a higher level. Each captain of the team have high responsibilities and management for the team.

"The most difficult thing I had to do was to get everybody on the same page so they could visualize my goals for the robot," said Ron Lazimi ’17, captain of the Bötley Crüe team. "Our robot is decently built with a good chance on getting past the qualifiers but we’re missing some major components like sensors because they didn’t come in time."

Even without the most vital parts of robots, the teams managed to work around the problem. Other captains also expresses their concerns and success.

Larger group portrait

Captain of The Rolling Drones Mari Geguchadze ’17 said, "I’ve never really had to account for an entire team before. Sometimes it’s a little suffocating. I think that aside, we have a pretty good grasp on the competition."

Although The Rolling Drones are experiencing some trouble coordinating, they’ve pulled through with a robot built much quicker than the other two teams.

"This year, AutoCad is very intense due to our time limit. The team works very well together trying to back each other up and giving good feedback on plans and tactics for winning," said Captain of Pink Droyd, Mohammad Ishtiaq ’17.

In the end, the most important thing is that all teams have each other’s support and working together to reach their ultimate goals. "

As time progressed, my team and I grew a bond together and we’re able to make changes and build on each other’s ideas," said Sidney Yee ’18, a builder of Bötley Crüe.

Matthew Eng ’17, another builder of Bötley Crüe, said, "Building with what we came up with was easy but testing and rebuilding takes a lot time in order to reach the consistency that is crucial to robots."

Smaller group portrait

Captains weren’t the only ones to have their hands full. Tasks assigned to team members receive high expectations and are expected to be complete within a certain time frame.

Budget is another problem in this year’s FTC competition. New logos were designed by each respective team. This means there needs to be a new batch of team attire to be ordered and each team member had to pay for their own attire.

"This year’s funds were a lot less than last years and I don’t have direct control over it. I can’t make everyone pay $30 for a T-shirt," said Mr. Jahn, coach of the robotics teams.

Funds were in the hands of Parent’s Association and accessing it was not as easy. With barely enough money to cover the fees of sign-up for the competition, funds were used sparingly.

However, Anthony Annuziato ’17 from Bötley Crüe managed to hook up everybody with three local sponsors. The team is able to get more funds for parts which helps greatly since many remaining parts for the robots were previously abused to even function properly. Sarah Wu ’17 and Tiffany Zhang ’17 from Pink Droyds also put in efforts in fundraising by crafting perler beads art.

This year we also have designed a completely new website ran by Pink Droyds team with Bötley Crüe’s contribution. It serves as a purpose of attraction for people who are interested in our program inside and outside of the school. Visit midwoodrobotics.org for more information and details about the teams and classes.

"It’s time for us to face the real challenge, and we are ready," said Javaid ’17.

Written by LeiBin Li (Class of 2018).
This article originally appeared in the January 2017 edition of Argus.

Nomon Mohammed receives 2 badges in the 2017 Regeneron STS

Posted on Wednesday, January 11, 2017 by for Awards, STS.

Midwood Science senior Nomon Mohammad received two digital badges for his entry in the 2017 Regeneron Science Talent Search (STS). The Society for Science and the Public in partnership with Regeneron Pharmaceuticals awards digital badges to inspire learning, confirm accomplishment, and validate the acquisition of knowledge or skills as part of the STS. Nomon was awarded the Research Report Badge for "a well-written, college-level, journal-style research report" and the Student Initiative Badge for "extraordinary effort and dedication in pursuit of scientific research" and "great accomplishments relative to the resources available".

Nomon worked under the supervision of Dr. Sophia Suarez and Mr. Domenec Paterno in the Department of Physics at Brooklyn College. The title of his project was "Anthraquinone as an effective electrolyte for redox flow batteries". Dr. Suarez has been a strong supporter of high school science research having worked with 31 Midwood students in the past 8 years (and with students from Murrrow, Madison, and elsewhere). Mr. Paterno is an outstanding undergraduate student with past degree work and professional experience in economics and mathematics education. Extra thanks to Dr. Suarez and Mr. Paterno.

 badge  badge

The Science Talent Search is as old as Midwood — 75 years. The STS has been sponsored by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation (1942–1998), the Intel Corporation (1998–2016), and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals (2016–????). You will sometimes hear old-timers refer to the STS as "The Westinghouse" or "The Intel". Some even call the Science Research program at Midwood by these names — but they shouldn’t. We are Midwood Science Research.

2016 Midwood Science Fair Results

Posted on Friday, June 10, 2016 by for Awards, Science Fair.

And the winners are…

1st Place

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Calvin Huynh
Effect of Calcium on Hatch Rates of Brine Shrimp
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Alice Mo & Md Hoque
The Buzz about Honey: Testing the reliability of honey labels from DNA

2nd Place

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Katie Nikishina
The Truth Behind the Vitamin C Concentration in Homemade and Brand Name Juices
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Shawal Malik
Vitamin C Concentration in Orange Juices
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Noran Abo-Donia & Saba Iqbal
Is your cereal genetically modified?

3rd Place

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Christina Ng
The Fizzy Chemistry of Bath Bombs
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Jessie Zheng & Jennifer Duong
The Buzz about Honey: Determining the Botanical Origins of Honey Using DNA Barcode

Honorable Mention

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Savlatjon Rahmatulloev
Aloe Vera Preservation
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Amy Leong
The Effect of Magnetic Fields on Water Flow
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Renata Sakaeva
Testing the Effectiveness of Natural Antifungal Agents vs. Drugstore Antifungal Agents
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Benjamin Nguyen
The Effect of Temperature and Direct vs. Refracted Light on a Solar Cell’s Ability to Absorb Voltage
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Hebah Jihad
What’s in a Face? Are Composite Faces More Attractive than Real Faces?
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Hafsa Fatima & Naila Mirza
The Verification of a Non-Genetically Modified Protein Bar
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Elizabeth Joseph & Sarah Elmosbah
To Be or Tu-Nah To Be
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Lisa Lu & Beien Lin
Phantom Sensations

Researchers Compete at ISEF

Posted on Thursday, June 9, 2016 by for ISEF, Media.

The Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF) winners were announced on May 12 and 13. Urooj Ansari ’16 and Bilal Azhar ’16, along with 14 other high school seniors, represented New York in this international competition.

The competition is split into several categories of science. Some categories include Biochemistry, Microbiology, Physics, Materials science and many more.

Ansari competed in Microbiology, while Azhar competed in Physics. Ansari and Azhar both got into the competition by winning the ISEF award in NYCSEF on April 1.

“The competition was a lot of fun. It required a lot of work, but the experience was worth it,” said Azhar.

Within each category, awards are given to first, second third and fourth place. In addition, “special awards” are given to competitors for specific criteria.

Ultimately, the Grand Prize is a special award given to the best presenter. Awards are given through judging.

Group photo in front of desert plants

Students are encouraged to prepare/design their posters with creativity and depth, and present with emphasis and clarity.

The specific rubric can be found on the Intel ISEF website. Mr. Glenn Elert, one of the Midwood Research teachers, said, “A lot of the science competitions have awards that are basically invites to other competitions.”

Students get individual awards; however, each competitor is part of a team representing a state/country. Virginia, New York, Canada, and even Japan competed in ISEF on May 12-17 in Phoenix, Arizona.

New York won several awards in a variety of categories. Ultimately, Canada has won the Grand Prize, The Gordon E. Moore Award of $75,000.

“ISEF is a lot of work, a lot of fun, and a lot of eating. We spent most of the time figuring out where we will eat,” said Elert.

The first place award was given to the project that developed a better microbial fuel cell that creates electricity effectively.

Ansari’s project focused on a “chemical warfare” between two oral bacteria. Azhar focused on the energy conversion in two different types of magnets used in solid state refrigeration.

Written by Michael Grandel (Class of 2017).
This article originally appeared in the June 2016 edition of Argus.

Sophomore Researchers Take Spotlight

Posted on Thursday, June 9, 2016 by for Media, Science Fair.

From projects on honey and bees to acid rain and corrosion, the science fair covered a wide range of topics and food. Mr. Glenn Elert coordinates the science fair each year, along with help from Ms. Stacy Goldstein and Ms. Shaniece Mosley.

According to Mr. Elert, he has been coordinating the science fair for about eight years, but Midwood itself has been holding the science fair ever since the school opened.

"The fair is a really exciting event," said Mr. Elert. "There’s a lot of energy and it’s a really great thing to experience, especially since some of the alumni come back."

Sophomore research students had to present their projects while the junior and senior research students were the judges. According to Mr. Elert, the judges score the presenters in different categories, then tally up the scores. Afterwards, Ms. Mosley and Ms. Goldstein look at all the scores on a spreadsheet since the presenters are seen by multiple judges, and decide on first, second and third place, along with honorable mentions. Winners will be decided in June after the scores are calculated.

Photo of one of the presentation rooms with presenters and judges
Presenters and judges at work.

Junior judge Mahmoud Abouelkheir ’17, reminisced about when he was a presenter and compared his presenting experience with his judging experience.

"It’s definitely a new experience from being in that presenter position last year to judging this year," said Abouelkheir. "It’s exciting but at the same time I’d prefer not to do it because I don’t like to be critical, especially to these students that worked so hard on their projects."

Abouelkheir said that he prefers presenting over judging because he feels he can better express himself in presenting instead of judging.

Other junior judge Zenab Jamil ’17, shared Abouelkheir’s excitement over judging, but would rather judge than present.

"It feels kind of nostalgic judging these projects because I was in their position last year," said Jamil. "I would definitely much rather judge though. It’s a lot less pressure and a lot less intimidating."

Senior judge Laila Akallal ’16, has already had her experience with presenting and judging, preferring the former.

"It’s really nice to see how the projects differ from year to year and see everyone come together," said Akallal. "Personally I like presenting a little more because I love sharing what I’ve learned and presenting is gonna be something that you’ll have to do later on in life as well."

The judges knew how stressed and worried the presenters were, so they tried to make it as smooth as possible. Abby Beginyazova ’18, is one of the many presenters and praised the judges for making the whole event comfortable for them and as easy as possible.

"Ms. Mosley and the judges really helped to make things easier for us. We had three weeks and I feel like that was a really short time since the first week was all AP tests," said Beginyazova. "Ms. Mosley and the judges gave us leeway because they knew how stressed we all were and how hard we all worked."

Beginyazova also said that she wished she had more time to work on the project so she could’ve done more trials, but she feels confident in her ability and her project.

Presenter Jessica Rakhamim ’18, shared Beginyazova’s appreciation of the judges and how they made the event as smooth as possible and the presenters comfortable.

"My partner and I worked on the project together. She’s a very artistic person and we described the project in a way that showed that music can be applied to science, and I think the judges made it a lot easier to do that," said Rakhamim. "For our project, we had to present our topic and discuss our data and show how it applied to real life. The judges asked questions that were simple and valid enough. Everyone was really nice."

After presenting, students were offered a variety of food, including  sandwiches, snacks and a multitude of sodas to reward them for their hard work. Elizabeth Skapley ’17, was gracious of the fact that the faculty had ordered food for everyone involved in the science fair.

"I think it’s a really nice thing that the school did to help. There were maybe more than a hundred of us and so much food. I’m surprised there were leftovers," said Skapley. "After a long day, it felt good to sit down with my friends and talk about what projects we liked the most. Overall, I’m happy with the results."

Written by Kaelah Blanchette and Yumna Ahmed (Class of 2017).
This article originally appeared in the June 2016 edition of Argus.

Researchers Dominate Brooklyn College Science Day

Posted on Saturday, May 21, 2016 by for Brooklyn College, Media.

Brooklyn College was buzzing with scientists from all over the city on Friday, May 6 for the annual Brooklyn College Science Day. However,  researchers from Midwood claimed all the awards in the high school division.

The competition kicked off at 9am, when students arrived to check-in and set up their posters. This was followed by a two hour judging period from 10am to noon. After a short lunch, awards were given out to the best presenters and their projects at 1pm.   

"I’m very proud of the students that won," said Mr. Glenn Elert, Senior Research Coordinator. "Everyone earned their awards through hard work and brains."

Kai Saunders ’16 and Noor Asif ’17 took home the first place honors. Urooj Ansari ’16 was awarded second place, and Roshan Chudry ’16  came in third place.

"I feel grateful to win again," said Saunders. "I feel more confident about my work and how much I can make an impact."

Award winner group photo
Kai Saunders, Noor Asif, Urooj Ansari, Roshan Chudry

Saunders has been on something of a hot streak lately claiming victories in all 5 of the research competitions this year. She was awarded with the equivalent of about $900 in awards and prizes from previous competitions, and she has earned a spot at the Junior Science and Humanities Symposia Program nationals.

"Honestly, I pray before every single competition I have," continued Saunders. "I repeat Matthew 19:26 in my head constantly throughout each competition, and it really boosts my confidence."

Asif’s first place finish is also impressive especially considering this is the first time she presented her project at an official competition. She is also the first and only junior to enter a research competition this year.

"When they were announcing the names for the high school winners, I definitely did not expect to win. Even when they said that the first place award went to someone from my professor’s, Dr. Grasso,  psychology lab, I assumed it was my friend," said Asif. " It felt so unreal when they called my name because as I said, I honestly didn’t expect any position, much less first place."

Like Saunders, Ansari has also strung together a series of victories.

"It felt great to win. My lab mates were in the audience and an undergrad from my lab also won. Sharing the moment with them made it much more special," she said. "We all spent countless hours in lab together and we were able to see our efforts pay off together."

Ansari also earned herself a coveted spot in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. This came after her first place finish at the New York City Science and Engineering Fair.

Large group photo
Brooklyn College Science Day — Friday, May 6, 2016

I was able to meet individuals my age who were just as passionate about STEM. Many of them were already CEOs of their own companies and were headed to prestigious colleges in the near future," said Ansari. "Being among such individuals was an honor. To this day, I find it hard to believe that I was selected to be one of the 15 students selected out of the 700 projects entered. It was an inspiring experience overall and has motivated me to work harder."

Last but not least, Roshan Chudry claimed her first award of the year on Friday.

"This is the first time I’ve won in research," said Chudry. "I was extra shocked at first, but then I was elated. I’m grateful and more motivated in my future endeavors in research."

This is the third straight year that the Midwood Science Research program was able to win every award at the high school level at Brooklyn College Science Day.

"We had the stronger projects and it showed," said Elert.

Written by Daniel Guobadia (Class of 2016).
This article originally appeared in the May 2016 edition of Argus.

Midwood students participate in award winning ACE Mentor Program

Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 by for Awards, Miscellaneous.

Team 30 from the ACE Mentor Program of Greater New York City won First Place and $5,000 at the CIRT-ACE Mentor National Design Competition for their New York City shoreline project, "RESILIEN-City". Midwood students William Xie, Adam Abdelhadi, and Jhecy Balansag were members of Team 30. Midwood student Leutrim Cahani was in Team 21.

Members of Team 30 posing in front of a CIRT/ACE backdrop. 2 team members holding posters describing their project on either side. Presenter Denise Calungsod standing center holding a bouquet of flowers.CIRT logo
ACE of Greater NYC/Team 30 at the CIRT-ACE Mentor National Design Competition. The presenter for Team 30 was Denise Calungsod (holding flowers) of LaGuardia High School. Source: CIRT.

The ACE Mentor Program is a not-for-profit organization that helps prepare high school students for careers in architecture, construction, and engineering through mentoring by industry professionals. ACE teams are made up of 15–30 students and 5–7 mentors from different industry disciplines. Top teams from across the US compete at the National Design Competition, which is organized and judged by the CEO members of the Construction Industry Round Table (CIRT). This year’s finals round was held on April 28, 2016 at the Marriott Metro Center in Washington, DC.

ACE logo

ACE has grown to more than 8,000 students and 2,500 mentors in 200 cities and 40 states. The ACE Mentor Program of Greater New York City has served over 5,000 students in New York and 65,000 students nationwide. 72% of ACE students are minorities and 49% are female. ACE New York has awarded $1,887,000 in scholarships to 915 program graduates. Interested students should apply over the summer or at the start of the academic year.

  • High school students, particularly from under-represented populations, are introduced to careers in the design and construction fields.
  • Teams are made up of 15–30 students and 5–7 mentors from different industry disciplines.
  • A Team Leader sets the project schedule, prepares meeting agendas and may host or arrange the meeting location.
  • At least 15 biweekly meetings are held from 4 to 6 PM during the school year.
  • Mentors present industry overviews, assign activities from ACE’s Best Practices Manual and guide the students through the development of a design project.
  • At the end of the season, students present their project just as a real design team would present to a potential client.
  • Scholarships are awarded to top students at a luncheon in May.

Screenshot of Leutrim, seated, talking to offscreen interviewer.Skanska logo
Midwood Science student Leutrim Cahani of Team 21 describes what he appreciates about the ACE Mentor program in a Skanska USA promotional video on YouTube.

Midwood Science receives 20 awards and over $5,000 in prize money at the 2016 NYC ACT-SO

Posted on Monday, May 9, 2016 by for ACT-SO, Awards.

Midwood Science students received 5 gold medals, 5 silver medals, 8 bonze medals, 2 special awards, and over $5,000 in prize money at the NYC ACT-SO Awards Ceremony held Monday, May 9, 2016. Gold Medals and $500 went to Nga Ying Lo, Kai Saunders, Yusra AbdurRob, Laila Akallal, and Shanayah Renois. These five students now have the opportunity to compete at the National ACT-SO July 14–17 at the Duke Energy Center in Cincinnati, Ohio.

The Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological, Scientific Olympics (ACT-SO) is a multidisciplinary academic competition for high school students sponsored by the NAACP, the nation’s largest and oldest civil rights organization. Students compete in 27 different categories in the sciences, visual arts, performing arts, humanities, and business. Students may enter projects and performances in multiple categories up to a maximum of 3. The National ACT-SO is held in conjunction with the NAACP National Convention each year.

ACT-SO began in 1976 as a local competition for students in Chicago, but quickly expanded across the United States. There are now approximately 200 local ACT-SO chapters. Much like the Olympic Games, there are bronze, silver, and gold medals for the top students. Again like the Olympic Games, medals are hung around the neck of the winners as they stand on a tri-level platform. When all the medals in a particular category have been awarded, the medalists arms are raised in triumph. ACT-SO’s unofficial nickname is "The Olympics of the Mind".

ACT-SO logo: hurdlers wearing graduation cap and gown

Gold Medal and $500

  • Nga Ying Lo won a Gold Medal in Chemistry & Biochemistry for her project "Development of an efficient synthesis of aryl trifluoromethylated compounds and the purification of products produced from reactions with vinylketenes." Nga Ying worked under the supervision of Dr. Wayne F.K. Schnatter in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Long Island University.
  • Kai Saunders won a Gold Medal in Earth & Space Science for her project "Urban soils: Metal content in artifacts." Kai worked under the supervision of Dr. Zhongqi (Joshua) Cheng in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Brooklyn College.
  • Yusra AbdurRob won a Gold Medal in Medicine & Health for her project "Photoreceptor layer thickness in Parkinson’s disease during circadian rhythm." Yusra worked under the supervision of Dr. Ivan Bodis-Wollner in the Department of Neurology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center.
  • Laila Akallal won a Gold Medal in Physics for her project "Entropy changes in first order and second order materials." Laila worked under the supervision of Dr. Karl Sandeman in the Department of Physics at Brooklyn College.
  • Shanayah Renois won a Gold Medal for her Original Essay "Colorism".

Silver Medal and $300

  • Rumsha Javed won a Silver Medal in Biology & Microbiology for her project "DNA-damage induced and p53-dependent nucleolin translocation in breast cancer cells." Rumsha worked under the supervision of Dr. Anjana D. Saxena in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.
  • Victor Lee won a Silver Medal in Biology & Microbiology for his project "Variations and similarities of nest construction behaviors amongst monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) of identical and different nest sites." Victor worked under the supervision of Dr. Frank Grasso in the Department of Psychology at Brooklyn College.
  • Xiu Ling Weng won a Silver Medal in Chemistry & Biochemistry for her project "Cycloaddition of tricarbonyl iron(0) vinylketene complex with methyl 3-iodopropiolate." Xiu Ling worked under the supervision of Dr. Wayne F.K. Schnatter in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Long Island University.
  • Roshan Chudry won a Silver Medal in Medicine & Health for her project "The effects of blinking exercises on computer vision syndrome." Roshan worked under the supervision of Dr. Mark Rosenfield in the Department of Biological Sciences at SUNY Optometry.
  • Joshua Pilipovsky won a Silver Medal in Physics for his project "Accuracy of the Ising approximation in quantum computation." Josh worked under the supervision of Dr. Vladimir Tsifrinovich in the Department of Applied Physics at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering.

Bronze Medal and $200

  • Emily Hui won a Bronze Medal in Biology & Microbiology for her project "Paternal investment in male-pregnant pipefish Syngnathus fuscus." Emily worked under the supervision of Dr. Tony Wilson in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.
  • Moomitu Kashem won a Bronze Medal in Biology & Microbiology for her project "Shady herbivores: The effect of urbanization on herbivory rates." Moomitu worked under the supervision of Mr. Jason Aloisio from Project TRUE at the Wildlife Conservation Society.
  • Urooj Ansari won a Bronze Medal in Biology & Microbiology for her project "The physical and chemical warfare between Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis." Urooj worked under the supervision of Dr. Nicolas Biais in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.
  • Jessica Lauv won a Bronze Medal in Chemistry & Biochemistry for her project "To utilize a new lithium reagent derivative to produce hydrazone vinyl ketenes to create steroids." Jessica worked under the supervision of Dr. Wayne F.K. Schnatter in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Long Island University.
  • Nikolas Magloire won a Bronze Medal in Medicine & Health for his project "Hydralazine’s effect on sodium hypochlorite." Nikolas worked under the supervision of Dr. Donald Gerber in the Department of Medicine at SUNY Downstate Medical Center.ACT-SO plaque honoring Midwood Medical [sic] High School
  • Bilal Azhar won a Bronze Medal in Physics for his project "Comparison of heat to work conversion in first order and second order magnets." Bilal worked under the supervision of Dr. Karl Sandeman in the Department of Physics at Brooklyn College.
  • Mie Abouelkheir won a Bronze Medal in Film making for her video "Ode to Home". Mie worked under the supervision Ms. Amanda Madden at Reelworks.
  • Yusra AbdurRob also won a Bronze Medal in Dance for doing an ethnic Bollywood dance to the theme song from the 2007 movie Aaja Nachle (Let’s Dance).

Special Awards

  • Urooj Ansari was awarded Ambassador of the Year and $125 for her exceptional service as an ACT-SO recruiter. Her work as a liaison between ACT-SO organizers and Midwood High School students and staff were indispensable.
  • Midwood High School was awarded Outstanding School of the Year "In recognition of your dedication and commitment to the education of our youth and your support of NYC ACT-SO".

Midwood sweeps Brooklyn College Science Day for the third year in a row

Posted on Friday, May 6, 2016 by for Awards, Brooklyn College.

Every year in May, the science students at Brooklyn College get together for a friendly poster competition amongst themselves. Every year they also ask high school students from Brooklyn to join them. Projects are separated by grade level (Graduate, Undergraduate, High School). For the third year in a row, Midwood Science has taken every one of the awards at the high school level. We even had two First Place winners this year — Kai Saunders (a senior) and Noor Asif (a junior). Award winning students were given prizes including Barnes and Noble gift cards, USB flash drives, portable phone chargers, and stainless steel water bottles. Everyone received a free pen, a free lunch, and a nice break from from classes during a stressful week of Advanced Placement Exams.

Award winner group photo
Kai Saunders, Noor Asif, Urooj Ansari, Roshan Chudry

  1. Noor Asif
    "Monk parakeets increase nest construction behavior during the mating season." Noor worked under the supervision of Dr. Frank Grasso in the Department of Psychology at Brooklyn College.
  2. Kai Saunders
    "Urban soils: Metal content in artifacts." Kai worked under the supervision of Dr. Zhongqi (Joshua) Cheng in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Brooklyn College.
  3. Urooj Ansari
    "The physical and chemical warfare between Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis." Urooj worked under the supervision of Dr. Nicolas Biais in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.
  4. Roshan Chudry
    "The effects of blinking exercises on computer vision syndrome." Roshan worked under the supervision of Dr. Mark Rosenfield in the Department of Biological Sciences at the SUNY College of Optometry.

Large group photo
Brooklyn College Science Day — Friday, May 6, 2016

Urooj Ansari and Bilal Azhar appear on News 12 Brooklyn

Posted on Friday, May 6, 2016 by for ISEF, Media.

News 12 Brooklyn, Cablevision’s local all-news channel, interviewed Bilal Azhar and Urooj Ansari on Wednesday, May 4th as they prepared for the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) the following week. Reporter Dana Arschin introduces us to the two young scientists. Watch the full video (1:38) on the News 12 Brooklyn website.

Screenshot of Bilal Azhar Screenshot of Urooj Ansari
Screenshot of Bilal on the left, Urooj on the right, and reporter Dana Arschin in the middle Screenshot of the News 12 Brooklyn logo
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