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Posted on Thursday, November 16, 2017 by for Juniors, Seniors.

Check the calendar

2017 Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research

Posted on Monday, October 30, 2017 by for Extra Credit, Lectures.

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Wednesday
8

On Wednesday, November 8, 2017, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will host its twelfth annual Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research lecture for high school and college students. (Members of the public are also welcome to attend.) The event will take place from 5:30–7:30 PM on the first floor of Memorial Sloan Kettering's Rockefeller Research Laboratories building (430 East 67th Street, between York and First Avenues).

Registration is preferred for this free event. Get there a bit early if possible to get a good seat. Pizza and refreshments will be served before the lecture beginz. Single use MetroCards will be made available for any student who needs one to attend.

One point of extra credit will be awarded to all students who attend and complete this assignment for any one of the speakers. (Consult the Extra Credit webpage for more info.) Official attendance is taken by group photo at the end of the event. Submit your completed (typed) assignment to Mr. Elert's Research Room mailbox by Friday, November 10.

Portrait Moderator

Memorial Sloan Kettering President Craig B. Thompson studies molecular signaling pathways that regulate nutrient uptake and the role these pathways play in the regulation of cell growth and survival.

Portrait Harnessing the Immune System to Fight Cancer: Rewiring the Molecular Circuitry of T cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

Cancer immunologist Andrea Schietinger investigates immune responses to cancer, molecular mechanisms underlying tumor-induced T cell dysfunction, and new approaches for cancer immunotherapy.

Portrait Develop the Organism, Kill the Cancer: Understanding the Evolutionary Origins of New Forms of Cell Death and Their Effects on Cancer

Cell biologisy Michael H. Overholtzer studies the mechanisms of tumor initiation and progression, cell adhesion, and cell death.

Portrait Shedding Light on Inflammation: Imaging White Blood Cell Recruitment in Live Zebrafish

Cell biologist Philipp M. Niethammer investigates wound responses using advanced imaging approaches in zebrafish.

Resumania 2017

Posted on Sunday, September 24, 2017 by for Extra Credit, Juniors, Seniors.

Monday, September 25 and Tuesday, September 26, 2017 are resume review days (a.k.a. Resumania). Juniors registered to Ms. Katzoff’s section of the class show up on Monday. Juniors in Mr. Elert’s section show up on Tuesday. We will meet in room A220 during period 9 on both days.

Seniors show up on both days for full extra credit or one out of two days for half extra credit. It is entirely possible that the meeting will run into period 10. If you have some need to leave quickly during this event, you should not volunteer to participate. Resumes will be divided as evenly as possible between the seniors that arrive on either day. More seniors means less work and a quicker departure.

Juniors will revise their resumes and then resubmit them. Place the second draft of your resume in your supervising teacher’s mailbox in the Research Room (A214) one business day before your next scheduled small group meeting. Groups assignments and meeting dates will be announced soon.

About the Siemens Competition

Posted on Sunday, September 10, 2017 by for Extra Credit, Seniors, Siemens.

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  • Eligible students are encouraged to enter this competition for extra credit. Research Reports may be submitted on projects in the fields of mathematics, engineering, biological, and physical sciences. Social and behavioral science research projects are not eligible.
  • Register using the Discovery Education website as soon as possible. The competition application is done entirely online. None of the “paperwork” uses actual paper.
  • Read and follow the guidelines set by the Siemens Foundation.
  • Paperwork is required of all students participating as well as the students’ parents, the principal, and a qualified scientist or other mentor. Thankfully, these requirements are easy to complete. Projects involving vertebrate animals require additional paperwork from the student and mentor.
  • This competition is centered around a research paper of 18 pages or fewer (not including abstract and references) and an executive summary (a.k.a. layperson’s summary). Absolutely no student names or references to gender (“he” or “she”), high schools, school officials, advisors, mentors, affiliated research organizations, acknowledgments, or any other identifying information of the entrants are to appear anywhere in the research paper.
  • Have your final application submission witnessed by your supervising teacher on or before Monday, September 18, 2017. Tuesday, September 19, 2017 is also allowed, but not preferred.
  • Up to 300 projects are selected as semifinalists. Up to 30 individual students and 30 teams (of 2 or 3 students) are chosen to compete at one of 6 regional competitions in November (MIT, Carnegie Mellon, Georgia Tech, Notre Dame, UT Austin, Cal Tech). Students’ names will be posted on the Siemens Foundation website Tuesday, October 17, 2017 for semifinalists and Wednesday, October 18, 2017 for regional finalists.
  • Winners of the regional competitions go on to the national competition in December at George Washington University.

Regeneron STS application now open

Posted on Wednesday, August 2, 2017 by for Extra Credit, Seniors, STS.

Seniors, the application for the 2018 Regeneron Science Talent Search (STS) is now open. In order to apply, you'll need to submit a research report, request recommendations from a mentor and an educator, request a high school report from a counselor, complete a series of essays about your research, and answer several questions about yourself. Instructions are available for review on multiple PDFs, but the entire application is electronic — no paper documents are needed. The application website closes on Wednesday, November 15 at 8:00 PM EST. Team projects are not allowed.

All eligible seniors should give serious consideration to this competition. Start the process as soon as possible. Summer is a good time to deal with things like this. Review the FAQs, the rules, and the application questions. Work on the research report that you will be using throughout the year. Write a first draft of the essays. Contact a person in your lab who knows you and your project and would be willing to recommend you. (This is not necessarily the head of the lab.) Regeneron STS logo Let your supervising teacher at Midwood know that you are applying so they can give you advice on the application process and begin working on their educator recommendation. Wait until October to deal with the high school report.

Three more things

Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 by for ACT-SO, Awards, Brooklyn College, Miscellaneous.

Steve Jobs of Apple used to end his keynote speeches with the phrase "One more thing". Well I can do better than Steve Jobs. I have three more things I want to tell you. Steve Jobs pretended like he almost forgot to tell you Apple's one impressive thing, but I actually forgot to tell you about Midwood Science's three impressive things. (And probably another three, but we'll save them for another day.)

Amna Aslam wins Gold, Jasleen Kaur wins Bronze at NYC ACT-SO

Posted on Wednesday, May 3, 2017 by for ACT-SO, Awards.

Midwood Science students sweep again at Brooklyn College Science Research Day

Posted on Friday, May 5, 2017 by for Awards, Brooklyn College.

Midwood Science projects strength again at the 2nd Teptu STEM and Entrepreneurship Conference

Posted on Friday, April 21, 2017 by for Awards, Miscellaneous.

Sophomores display projects at Science Fair

Posted on Tuesday, June 6, 2017 by for Media, Science Fair.

The stage was set for the sophomore researchers as they present their projects for all of the research students to see.

Sophomore researchers were brought to the present on May 24 for the annual science fair. Coordinated by Mr. Glenn Elert, the presenters each had a project that research teachers Ms. Shaniece Mosley and Ms. Stacy Goldstein.

They have been conducting experiments, collecting and analyzing data, and practicing their speaking skills in preparation for the fair.

"The science fair is always exciting for both the presenters and the judges," said Mr. Elert. "Each year, we always have our special judges which consist of alumni who come back to judge again and be a part of the science fair."

Before the event, Mr. Elert held a short speech guiding all the judges. With 110 judges in all, they consisted of junior, senior, and alumni researchers.

"For me last year, getting judged by upperclassmen was a bit nerve-wracking," said Saba Iqbal '18. "This year, I want to be sure I make the students as comfortable as possible when presenting to me."

To score the presenters, the judges each watch three sophomores present their project. Then, on a paper with categories including the poster board, methods, introduction of the project, and total analysis, the judges give the presenters scores on a scale of 1–10. Then, they add up the individual category scores. The winners of the projects include first place, second place, third place, and honorary mentions.

Vladimir Svidruk '19 presented his project on cockroaches and their tolerance to certain environments.

"I bought my cockroaches from a petshop and then tested them with certain materials." said Svidruk. "Ms. Goldstein heavily prepared us for the event, she provided us with the necessary materials that were needed for some projects, including mine."

After doing many presentations during research classes, Kenny Pierre Louis '19 shared Svidruk's thoughts.

"After doing many presentations with [Mr. K and Ms. Mosley] it really positively affected how I presented in front of the judges."

Participants with posterboards and judges with clipboards

In preparing for the science fair, some of the presenters gained more than just a new science idea.

"In doing this project, I learned a lot about presentation and being able to speak to an audience effectively." said Pierre Louis It took a lot of time making, ordering, and setting up, time management was something I really got from doing the science fair."

Svidruk also admitted that it not only allowed him to gain experience in presenting, but it showed him more into the science field.

"I wouldn't consider myself as a very science type of person, but after doing this it was kind of interesting finding out about spikes and neurons and how they all relate to us humans as well," said Svidruk.

The judges and presenters were all given food afterwards, coordinated by Mr. Tovia Rosenfeld, which consisted of sandwiches, salads, desserts, and drinks. During this time, the judges and presenters gathered with their friends and some seniors spoke about how they may not be able to see all this next year.

"The science fair has always been something that was so much fun to do," said Hufsa Tasnim '17. "It gets me really upset that I may not be able to see all this next year, I will try my best to become a guest judge."

Midwood has been holding the event since the school opened in the 1940s.

Vincent Wang '18 said, "It feels weird being on the other end now, judging these sophomores makes myself proud on how far I've achieved within the research program and that I haven't gave up that drive I had as a sophomore last year."

Juniors had been assigned three to four projects to judge and graded them on a system of 60 points for idividual projects and 70 points for team projects.

Nimrah Naseer '19 said, "This [project] was really stressful for me, I like the writing aspect of science research but the actual hands on activities aren't my favorite part."

The science fair started after tenth period, judging started as the sophomores finalized their boards. After most juniors were done judging the projects and grading them on a rubric, the fair ended off with food being served for all.

Written by Sumaya Ahmed & Ashley Masih (Class of 2018).
This article originally appeared in the June 2017 edition of Argus.

2017 Midwood Science Fair Results

Posted on Friday, June 2, 2017 by for Awards, Science Fair.

And the winners are…

1st Place

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Zoe Robertson
Buffers for Acid Rain
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Ahmad Choudhry & Daniel Gaft
Squirm of the Worm

2nd Place

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Ifra Khan
Birth Order and Personality
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Humayara Karim & Zuha Ahmed
The Search for Bacteria
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Zara Nadeem
The Vitamin C Concentration In Homemade Orange Juice vs. Brand Name

3rd Place

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Maqadus Sakhi & Fizza Nayab
What the fizz
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Emily Movsumova
Testing the Efficiency of Acids on the Rate of Milk Curdling by Using Spectrophotometry Analysis

Honorable Mention

Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Tiffany Huynh & Fiona Lin
Do Seeds Need H2O2?
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Sonel Rubinstein
A Taste of Bacteria
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Allen Borshch & Andrew Kobrin
Electrolyte Concentration of Liquids
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Nimrah Naseer
Rust Busters
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Ashley Chen & Amy Chen
The effect of different colored solutions on the absorption of light
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Jie Tang
Kill the Plastic Bottles!
Traditional photo of the award winner holding their trophy standing in front of their poster board
Yvette Somersel & Michelle Koshelyuk
Calculating Vitamin C Using Titration
 

Junior Exit Meetings and Summer School MetroCards

Posted on Friday, June 2, 2017 by for Juniors.

Airplane emergency card exit cartoon   ☜ All of my juniors should meet with me period 3, 5, 7, 8, or 9 on Monday, June 5 for an exit meeting. Bring your lab log. Topics for discussion include spring semester grades and summer research plans.   MetroCard Man at 2011 Maker Faire with 2 Midwood students
 
☞ Summer school MetroCards will be arranged for students that need them. Have your mentor contact me stating that you will be working in their lab over the summer. MetroCards will be available in the first or second week of July and will expire in the middle of August.

Senior Exit Meetings

Posted on Friday, June 2, 2017 by for Seniors.

 
  Email proof of service at the World Science Festival by Midnight Sunday, June 4. Email photos of yourself working each day and your volunteer itinerary.
 
  Return your drawer key on Tuesday, June 6 or Wednesday, June 7.
 
  Bring your 3rd marking period service log. Bring it even if it is blank.

Midwood alumna’s article on 2017 Science Fair featured on BKLYNER website

Posted on Thursday, June 1, 2017 by for Media, Science Fair.

Midwood Science alumna Zainab Iqbal (class of 2015) reported on this year’s science fair for the local news website BKLYNER. Her article, 10th Annual Midwood HS Science Fair – A Glimpse, offered slice-of-life descriptions of the fair, facts about the science research program at Midwood, and a quick spotlight on senior Mahmoud Abouelkheir and his recent trip to the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in Los Angeles. Follow these links to read more of Zainab’s contributions to BKLYNER and Excelsior (Brooklyn College’s student run news publication).

Winners of the 2017 Midwood Science Fair will be announced sometime after 3:30 PM on Friday, June 2, 2017.

Science fair competitor standing in front of her posterboard Posterboard entitled 'Where do lizards go to lunch?' Judges and contestants in one of the judging rooms
BKLYNER logo Excelsior logo

2017 Science Fair Abstract Book

Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2017 by for Science Fair.

2010 abstract book 2017 abstract book
2011 abstract book
2012 abstract book
2013 abstract book 2014 abstract book 2015 abstract book 2016 abstract book

Team NYC at 2017 Intel ISEF Public Viewing

Posted on Friday, May 19, 2017 by for ISEF.

Team NYC relaxes at Universal Studios Hollywood, Intel pays the bill

Posted on Thursday, May 18, 2017 by for ISEF.

Students and teachers attending the 2017 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) were granted free access to the Universal Studios Hollywood theme park after the main part of the competition. Rides and restaurants were made available free of charge from 7 PM until midnight. This included The Wizarding World of Harry Potter, The Simpsons Ride, Revenge of the Mummy, and Jurassic Park — The Ride. Unlimited Butter Beer was enjoyed by all.

Group photo in front of the Unversal Studios globe

Team NYC on its way to the 2017 Intel ISEF

Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 by for ISEF.

Judging is now underway at the 2017 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Team NYC's 14 students are competing against nearly 1,800 students from over 70 countries. This is the biggest science event for high school students on the planet. Our man from Midwood Science is Mahmoud Abouelkheir (2nd from left in the back row). Public viewing is tomorrow, Thursday, May 18 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM. Come visit us if you're in the downtown LA area.

Group photo in front of the LA Convention Center
Back row: Benjamin Firester, Mahmoud Abouelkheir, Gregory Gueorguiev,
Neeraj Sakhrani, Ajmain Yamin, Thomas Lee, Stephanie Li, Vera Zarubin
Front row: Dylan Li, Ryan Foo, Karen Jiang, Jessica Frank, Sharon Lin, Georja Fotiou

One week to the Midwood Science Fair

Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 by for Science Fair.

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Wednesday
24

The Midwood Science Fair is almost upon us. Wednesday, May 24, 2017 will be here before you know it. Juniors and seniors meet in the Library period 9. Alumni and other registered celebrity judges show up around 2:45–3:30 (a little early is better than a little late). Sophomores be in your assigned spot by the start of period 11 (your board will be waiting for you). Everyone be prepared for an afternoon of science and celebration.

Midwood Science students sweep again at Brooklyn College Science Research Day

Posted on Friday, May 5, 2017 by for Awards, Brooklyn College.

Every spring, the Brooklyn College community gathers for the annual Science Research Day. This event showcases the research of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students at Brooklyn College and other CUNY schools. On Friday, May 5, 2017 around 150 students presented their research across 14 categories in STEM, with over 50 faculty members and students from the college serving as judges. Midwood won all three awards in the high school division. For the second year in a row, a junior from Dr. Frank Grasso's Biomimetic and Cognitive Robotics lab won the top prize. Congratulations to Aushna Saleem, Nomon Mohammad, and Jasleen Kaur.

  1. Aushna Saleem
    "Listen to me! Older monk parakeets vocalize significantly more than young in social stiuations." Aushna worked under the supervision of Dr. Frank Grasso and Dr. Andrew Fulmer in the Department of Psychology at Brooklyn College.
  2. Nomon Mohammad
    "Anthraquinone as an effective electrolyte for redox flow batteries." Nomon worked under the supervision of Dr. Sophia Suarez and Mr. Domenec Paterno in the Department of Physics at Brooklyn College.
  3. Jasleen Kaur
    "Evaluating efficient methods for determining bioaccessible lead." Jasleen worked under the supervision of Dr. Zhongqi (Joshua) Cheng and Ms. Sara Perl Egendorf in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Brooklyn College.

Amna Aslam wins Gold, Jasleen Kaur wins Bronze at NYC ACT-SO

Posted on Wednesday, May 3, 2017 by for ACT-SO, Awards.

The New York Academic, Cultural, Technological, Scientific Olympics (NYC ACT-SO) was held Saturday, April 22, 2017 at Edward R. Murrow High School. Often called the "Olympics of the Mind", ACT-SO is a youth program under the administrative aegis of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Students compete in one of 28 academic categories, including 8 sciences. Midwood had 2 medalists this year — Amna Aslam (Gold) and Jasleen Kaur (Bronze). As a gold medalist, Amna goes on to compete in the National ACT-SO July 20–23, 2017 at the 108th NAACP National Convention in Baltimore, Maryland. Wish her good luck.

  1. Amna Aslam received a Gold Medal and $500 in Biology/Microbiology for her project "Role of nucleolar stress factors in DNA damage response." Amna worked under the supervision of Dr. Anjana D. Saxena in the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College.
  2. Jasleen Kaur received a Bronze Medal and $200 in Earth and Space Sciences for her project "Evaluating efficient methods for determining bioaccessible lead." Jasleen worked under the supervision of Dr. Zhongqi (Joshua) Cheng and Ms. Sara Perl Egendorf in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Brooklyn College.

Hornets Come Out on Top at NYSEF

Posted on Monday, May 1, 2017 by for Media, NYCSEF.

Out of 130 finalists, seven students from Midwood made the NYCSEF finals and showcased their projects at the Museum of Natural History. The finalists are Mahmoud Abouelkheir '17, Allan Nosov '17, Nomon Mohammad '17, Lilin Liu '17, Vivian Luu '17, Minna Zeldin '17, and Amna Aslam '17.

According to midwoodscience.org, NYCSEF, also called the New York City Science and Engineering Fair, is a yearly competition in which hundreds of students participate in a preliminary round at City College and a final round at the Museum of Natural History. Sponsored by the Department of Education and CUNY, NYCSEF allows students to learn about a field they're interested in and get a chance to become a recognized and accomplished person, which also stands out on a college application.

Mentors at Brooklyn College, City College and the Hospital for Special Surgery supervised the finalists. They did projects in different fields, such as biology, physics, and earth and environmental science and presented them to expert judges. The winners can get various awards, internships, scholarships, and cash prizes.

One of the top projects included "Intra-microcolony spatial positioning affects antibiotic susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae," by Mahmoud Abouelkheir. He was awarded the NYCSEF First Award and the Intel ISEF award, which are the highest awards of the competition. Abouelkheir expressed his excitement, as winning an award and competing with others is something he would never forget.

"NYCSEF was a different experience that other science fairs I've been to. I also participated in the first and second round," he said. "I did not think I was going to become a finalist. It was really cool that I had one of the top projects."

Nomon Mohammad received the NYCSEF Second Award and the ASM Materials Education Foundation Award for his engineering project on studying different ways to use electrolytes to optimize energy storage in batteries. Mohammad described his experience at NYCSEF and believed that winning the award was a symbol of the hard work and he and his lab put into the project.

7 students arranged around a large lunar globe
Vivian Luu, Amna Aslam, Nomon Mohammad, Allan Nosov,
Mahmoud Abouelkeir, Minna Zeldin, Lilin Liu

"It was interesting to see other people's projects at the competition because it really represented their scientific exploration and their effort," he said. "I hope that the research program grows in the coming years because it's something that can change one's perspective on science."

Lilin Liu was one of the students to win the NYCSEF Third Award, but also won the Brooklyn Navy Yard Award for her project testing the effectiveness of x-ray fluorescence on lead contaminated vegetables.

"Winning an award is always beneficial. Not only does it make you feel good, but it's good for college too. I also received a paid internship because of this project – it's a good opportunity and can help me achieve more in the future," she said.

Allan Nosov, another student to receive the NYCSEF Second Award, did an earth and environmental science project called "Lapse rate analysis — model versus observations." Nosov felt honored to have competed with the other students and found the event to be enjoyable.

"Competing with the other students was fun because their projects were really exceptional. It was fun because I met new people from other schools and I think it was a good educational opportunity," he said.

The top 16 projects will continue on and represent New York City at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in Los Angeles, California during May 14–19. For more information on the finalists, visit nycsef.cuny.edu.

Written by Yumna Ahmed Qazi (Class of 2017).
Sara Omran (Class of 2019) and Shakila Islam (Class of 2018) also contributed to this article.
This article originally appeared in the April 2017 edition of Argus.

Application for Change to 1.05 Weighted Course

Posted on Sunday, April 30, 2017 by for Juniors, Seniors.

pdf icon

All juniors and seniors with a currently active research placement who would like to apply for a 1.05 weighted research course (Honors Science Research) for the spring semester of 2016 must fill out, print, sign, and present this form to their supervising teacher along with an up to date lab log. You need to apply every semester. Renewal is not automatic. See your supervising teacher sometime Monday through Thursday this week unless you were told to do something different.

An "active" placement in the fall is one with 16 hours (on average) of lab log entries per month for February, March, and April. A placement is not official until your mentor has contacted me saying you have been accepted to work in their lab. It should also state the date you began working there. A handful of juniors still have not done this. You will be contacted by email if this is the case.

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Mr. Elert (Coordinator) A214 elert@ midwoodscience.org 2141
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Ms. Katzoff A300 skatzoff@ midwoodhighschool.org 3001
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Mr. McDonnell (Principal) 127 mmcdonn2@ schools.nyc.gov 1270
Ms. Kornaker (Assistant Principal) A300 jkornaker@ schools.nyc.gov 3003
Mr. Rosenfeld (Assistant Principal) A200 trosenf@ schools.nyc.gov 2003